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Probing A Traffic Congestion Controversy: A Comment


  • Erik T. Verhoef


Ohta (2001) claims to have resolved a die-hard controversy on traffic congestion modeling by defining an inverse aggregate demand function that has traffic density as its argument-in Ohta's terminology the 'primitive term.'Using this demand function, Ohta shows that 'hypercongestion' may very well be an optimal stationary state. This contribution argues that at least if what road users demand is completed trips, and if time spent on the road while traveling implies a cost, then Ohta's approach is fundamentally flawed. Also the conclusion that hypercongestion can be optimal is no longer valid. Copyright 2001 Blackwell Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Erik T. Verhoef, 2001. "Probing A Traffic Congestion Controversy: A Comment," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(4), pages 681-694.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:41:y:2001:i:4:p:681-694

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Verhoef, Erik T., 2005. "Speed-flow relations and cost functions for congested traffic: Theory and empirical analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(7-9), pages 792-812.

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