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Regulation Fair Disclosure and the Cost of Adverse Selection

Author

Listed:
  • BALJIT SIDHU
  • TOM SMITH
  • ROBERT E. WHALEY
  • RICHARD H. WILLIS

Abstract

ABSTRACT Regulation Fair Disclosure (FD), imposed by the Securities and Exchange Commission in October 2000, was designed to prohibit disclosure of material private information to selected market participants. The informational advantage such select participants gain is unclear. If multiple "insiders" receive identical information, private information is immediately incorporated in price and each insider has zero expected profit. If, on the other hand, Regulation FD has curtailed the flow of information from firms, private information becomes longer-lived and more valuable. Hence, market makers will demand increased compensation by widening the adverse selection component of the bid-ask spread. We identify the cost components of the bid-ask spread for a sample of NASDAQ stocks surrounding the implementation of Regulation FD. Controlling for other factors affecting the spread, we find that adverse selection costs increase approximately 36% after Regulation FD. We interpret our finding as Regulation FD failing to achieve one of its desired objectives. Copyright (c)University of Chicago on behalf of the Institute of Professional Accounting, 2008.

Suggested Citation

  • Baljit Sidhu & Tom Smith & Robert E. Whaley & Richard H. Willis, 2008. "Regulation Fair Disclosure and the Cost of Adverse Selection," Journal of Accounting Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(3), pages 697-728, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:joares:v:46:y:2008:i:3:p:697-728
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    1. repec:bla:acctfi:v:57:y:2017:i:1:p:289-315 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Jie Cai & Yixin Liu & Yiming Qian & Miaomiao Yu, 2015. "Information Asymmetry and Corporate Governance," Quarterly Journal of Finance (QJF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 5(03), pages 1-32, September.
    3. Bai, Jennie & Philippon, Thomas & Savov, Alexi, 2016. "Have financial markets become more informative?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(3), pages 625-654.
    4. Vinay Patel, 2015. "Price Discovery in US and Australian Stock and Options Markets," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 27, january-d.
    5. Boone, Audra L. & White, Joshua T., 2015. "The effect of institutional ownership on firm transparency and information production," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 508-533.
    6. Shen, Carl Hsin-han, 2014. "Pecking order, access to public debt market, and information asymmetry," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 291-306.
    7. Petacchi, Reining, 2015. "Information asymmetry and capital structure: Evidence from regulation FD," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 143-162.
    8. Anderson, Ronald C. & Reeb, David M. & Zhang, Yuzhao & Zhao, Wanli, 2013. "The efficacy of regulatory intervention: Evidence from the distribution of informed option trading," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4337-4352.
    9. Patel, Vinay & Michayluk, David, 2016. "Return predictability following different drivers of large price changes," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 202-214.
    10. Beyer, Anne & Cohen, Daniel A. & Lys, Thomas Z. & Walther, Beverly R., 2010. "The financial reporting environment: Review of the recent literature," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2-3), pages 296-343, December.
    11. Li, Yutao & Saunders, Anthony & Shao, Pei, 2015. "Did Regulation Fair Disclosure affect credit markets?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 46-59.
    12. repec:eee:jaecon:v:65:y:2018:i:2:p:358-379 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Yu, Susana & Webb, Gwendolyn, 2017. "Market adaptation to Regulation Fair Disclosure: The use of industry information to enhance the informational environment," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 1-12.

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