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A Theory of Voluntary Unrequited International Transfers

Author

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  • Murray C. Kemp
  • Koji Shimomura

Abstract

This paper proposes a theory of voluntary unrequited international transfers which explicitly allows for an international externality such that the well being of each country is influenced by the well being of other countries. Formulating a simple two–country and two–commodity model, this paper shows that (a) either neither country extends aid to the other, or one country extends aid and both countries benefit from the aid; and (b) there exist acceptable (Arrow–Debreu) economies such that neither country extends aid to the other, and there exist acceptable economies such that one country extends aid to the other. JEL Classification Numbers: F11, F35.

Suggested Citation

  • Murray C. Kemp & Koji Shimomura, 2002. "A Theory of Voluntary Unrequited International Transfers," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 53(3), pages 290-300, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:53:y:2002:i:3:p:290-300
    DOI: 10.1111/1468-5876.00229
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-5876.00229
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    Cited by:

    1. Emily T. Cremers & Partha Sen, 2005. "Transfers and the Terms of Trade in an Overlapping Generations Model," Working papers 138, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
    2. Kojun Hamada & Mitsuyoshi Yanagihara, 2014. "Donor Altruism and the Transfer Paradox in an Overlapping Generations Model," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(5), pages 905-922, November.
    3. Steven Brakman & Charles van Marrewijk, 2005. "Transfers, Non-Traded Goods, and Unemployment: An Analysis of the Keynes – Ohlin Debate," CESifo Working Paper Series 1588, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Steven Brakman & Charles Van Marrewijk, 2007. "Transfers, Nontraded Goods, and Unemployment: An Analysis of the Keynes-Ohlin Debate," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 39(1), pages 121-143, Spring.
    5. Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu & Majumdar, Baishali, 2004. "Multilateral transfers, export taxation and asymmetry," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 715-725, April.
    6. Emily T. Cremers, 2008. "Transfers, the Terms of Trade and Capital Accumulation," DEGIT Conference Papers c013_018, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    7. Murray C. Kemp & Ngo Van Long, 2007. "Development Aid in the Presence of Corruption: Differential Games among Donors," CIRANO Working Papers 2007s-23, CIRANO.
    8. Murray C. Kemp & Ngo Van Long, 2009. "Foreign Aid in the Presence of Corruption: Differential Games among Donors," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(SI), pages 230-243, May.
    9. Schweinberger, Albert G. & Lahiri, Sajal, 2006. "On the provision of official and private foreign aid," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 179-197, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid

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