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Foreign capital flows in the century of Britain's industrial revolution: new estimates, controlled conjectures




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  • Elise S. Brezis, 1995. "Foreign capital flows in the century of Britain's industrial revolution: new estimates, controlled conjectures," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 48(1), pages 46-67, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:48:y:1995:i:1:p:46-67

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Trounson, J.H., 1989. "Cornish Mineral Industry," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 0, number 9780859893343 edited by Burt, Roger, March.
    2. Lewis, George Randall, 1908. "The Stannaries: A Study of the Medieval Tin Miners of Cornwall and Devon," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number lewis1908.
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    Cited by:

    1. de la Escosura, Leandro Prados, 2010. "Spain’s international position, 1850-1913," Revista de Historia Económica, Cambridge University Press, vol. 28(01), pages 173-215, March.
    2. van de Klundert, Theo & Smulders, Sjak, 2001. "Loss of technological leadership of rentier economies: a two-country endogenous growth model," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 211-231, June.
    3. Mehmet MERCAN, 2014. "Feldstein-Horioka Hipotezinin AB-15 ve Turkiye Ekonomisi icin Sinanmasi: Yatay Kesit Bagimliligi Altinda Yapisal Kirilmali Dinamik Panel Veri Analizi," Ege Academic Review, Ege University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, vol. 14(2), pages 231-245.
    4. Maurice Obstfeld & Alan M. Taylor, 2003. "Globalization and Capital Markets," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 121-188 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Flandreau, Marc & Sussman, Nathan, 2004. "Old Sins: Exchange Rate Clauses and European Foreign Lending in the 19th Century," CEPR Discussion Papers 4248, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Marc Flandreau & Nathan Sussman, 2004. "Old sins. Exchange Clauses and European Foreign Lending in the 19th Century," Working Papers hal-01065494, HAL.
    7. Officer, Lawrence H., 2002. "The U.S. Specie Standard, 1792-1932: Some Monetarist Arithmetic," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 113-153, April.
    8. Yuichi Furukawa, 2015. "Leapfrogging cycles in international competition," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 59(2), pages 401-433, June.
    9. Alan M. Taylor, 2002. "Globalization, Trade, and Development: Some Lessons From History," NBER Working Papers 9326, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Brezis, Elise S., 2001. "Social classes, demographic transition and economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 707-717, May.
    11. van Bavel, Bas, 2016. "The Invisible Hand?: How Market Economies have Emerged and Declined Since AD 500," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199608133, June.
    12. Furukawa, Yuichi, 2012. "Perpetual leapfrogging in international competition," MPRA Paper 40126, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jul 2012.
    13. Gunther Tichy, 2014. "On Transformations in Financing Structure in an Affluent Society," WIFO Working Papers 488, WIFO.
    14. Gunther Tichy, 2015. "On transformations in financing structure in an affluent society," WWWforEurope Policy Paper series 20, WWWforEurope.
    15. Prados de la Escosura, Leandro, 2018. "Foreign Capital in 19th Century Spain's Investment Boom," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH 26196, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    16. Michael D. Bordo & Barry Eichengreen & Douglas A. Irwin, 1999. "Is Globalization Today Really Different than Globalization a Hunderd Years Ago?," NBER Working Papers 7195, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Brezis, Elise S., 2010. "Can demographic transition only be explained by altruistic and neo-Malthusian models?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 233-240, April.

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