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Humanitarian Aid, Fertility and Economic Growth

Listed author(s):
  • KYRIAKOS C. NEANIDIS

This paper examines the e¤ect of humanitarian aid on the rates of fertility and economic growth in recipient countries. We develop a two-period overlapping generations model where reproductive agents face a non-zero probability of death in childhood. As adults, agents allocate their time to work, leisure, and child rearing activities of surviving children. Health status in adulthood exhibits “state dependence”as it depends on health in childhood. Humanitarian aid in‡uences the probability of survival to adulthood, health in childhood, and the time adults allocate to child rearing, giving rise to an ambiguous e¤ect on both the rates of fertility and growth. An empirical examination for the period 1973-2007 suggests that humanitarian aid has on average a zero e¤ect on both the fertility rate and the rate of per capita output growth. The …ndings are robust to a wide number of sensitivity considerations.

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Article provided by London School of Economics and Political Science in its journal Economica.

Volume (Year): 79 (2012)
Issue (Month): 313 (01)
Pages: 27-61

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Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:79:y:2012:i:313:p:27-61
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