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Immigration Policy and Highly Skilled Workers: The Case of Japan

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  • Scott M. Fuess

Abstract

Concerned about shortages of highly skilled workers, especially those with international specialties, Japan adjusted its immigration policy in 1990. The government made it easier for skilled foreign specialists to work in Japan. In the wake of the policy adjustment, this study examines whether there have been changes in inflows of skilled foreigners. Though Japan is still wary of immigration and official policy remains comparatively strict, it is clear that skilled professionals are entering Japan in larger numbers. Copyright 2003 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Scott M. Fuess, 2003. "Immigration Policy and Highly Skilled Workers: The Case of Japan," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(2), pages 243-257, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:21:y:2003:i:2:p:243-257
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    Cited by:

    1. D'Costa, Anthony P., 2004. "Globalization, Development, and Mobility of Technical Talent: India and Japan in Comparative Perspectives," WIDER Working Paper Series 062, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Yamamura, Eiji, 2009. "Frequency of contact with foreigners in a homogenous society: perceived consequences of foreigner increases in Japan," MPRA Paper 14646, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Subhayu Bandyopadhyay & Howard Wall, 2008. "Is there too little immigration? An analysis of temporary skilled migration," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 197-211.
    4. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "Frequency of contact with foreigners in a homogeneous society: perceived consequences of foreigner increases," MPRA Paper 33852, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Phillips, Kerk L., 2010. "A Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis of Japanese & Korean Immigration," MPRA Paper 23501, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Phillips, Kerk L., 2010. "The Dynamic Effects of Changes to Japanese Immigration Policy," MPRA Paper 23673, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu & Wall, Howard J., 2007. "Is There Too Little Immigration?," IZA Discussion Papers 2825, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Masanori Hashimoto & Yoshio Higuchi, 2005. "Issues Facing the Japanese Labor Market," Working Papers 05-01, Ohio State University, Department of Economics.

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