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Do reductions in tick sizes influence liquidity?

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  • Michael Aitken
  • Carole Comerton‐Forde

Abstract

On 4 December 1995, the Australian Stock Exchange reduced the minimum tick size for stocks priced below $A0.50 and stocks priced above $A10. We use this natural experiment to examine the impact of tick size reductions on liquidity. The present paper reports that although lower tick sizes generally lead to increased liquidity, this result is not universal. Stocks with larger relative tick sizes experience the greatest improvement in liquidity, while stocks with small relative tick sizes and low trading volume experience reduced liquidity. There is no change in order exposure as a result of the reduced tick sizes.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Aitken & Carole Comerton‐Forde, 2005. "Do reductions in tick sizes influence liquidity?," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 45(2), pages 171-184, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:acctfi:v:45:y:2005:i:2:p:171-184
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-629x.2004.00128.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-629x.2004.00128.x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Benson, Karen & Faff, Robert & Smith, Tom, 2015. "Injecting liquidity into liquidity research," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 35(PB), pages 533-540.
    2. Lepone, Andrew & Wong, Jin Boon, 2017. "Pseudo market-makers, market quality and the minimum tick size," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 88-100.
    3. Rui Ma & Hamish D. Anderson & Ben R. Marshall, 2016. "International stock market liquidity: a review," Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 42(2), pages 118-135, February.
    4. Michael J. Fleming & Giang Nguyen & Francisco Ruela, 2019. "Tick size change and market quality in the U.S. treasury market," Staff Reports 886, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    5. Lai, Kam-Wah & Leung, Patrick W., 2018. "Unintended consequences of securities regulation: Stock value loss upon potential involuntary delisting in Hong Kong," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 219-226.
    6. Henk Berkman & Carole Comerton‐Forde, 2011. "Market microstructure: A review from down under," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 51(1), pages 50-78, March.
    7. Murphy Jun Jie Lee, 2013. "The Microstructure of Trading Processes on the Singapore Exchange," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 2-2013.
    8. Comerton-Forde, Carole & Rydge, James, 2006. "The current state of Asia-Pacific stock exchanges: A critical review of market design," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 1-32, January.
    9. Xiao, Xijuan & Yamamoto, Ryuichi, 2020. "Price discovery, order submission, and tick size during preopen period," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    10. Ze-To, Samuel Yau Man, 2016. "Asset liquidity and stock returns," Advances in accounting, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 177-196.
    11. Murphy Jun Jie Lee, 2013. "The Microstructure of Trading Processes on the Singapore Exchange," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 4, July-Dece.
    12. Ghassan Omet, 2011. "Stock Market Liquidity: Comparative Analysis of The Abu Dhabi Stock Exchange and Dubai Financial Market," Working Papers 655, Economic Research Forum, revised 12 Jan 2011.

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