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Access, Competition and Risk in Centrally Cleared Markets


  • Jean-Sébastien Fontaine
  • Héctor Pérez Saiz
  • Joshua Slive

    (Bank of Canada)


Central counterparties can make over-the-counter markets more resilient and reduce systemic risk by mitigating and managing counterparty credit risk. These benefits are maximized when access to central counterparties is available to a wide range of market participants. In an over-the-counter market, there is an important trade-off between risk and competition. A model of an over-the-counter market shows how risk and competition could be influenced by the incentives of market participants as they move to central clearing. In a centrally cleared market, there may be less risk when participation is high. This helps to explain why regulators have put in place requirements for fair, open and risk-based access criteria.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Sébastien Fontaine & Héctor Pérez Saiz & Joshua Slive, 2012. "Access, Competition and Risk in Centrally Cleared Markets," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2012(Autumn), pages 14-22.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bcarev:v:2012:y:2012:i:autumn12:p:14-22

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lane, T. & Dion, J.-P. & Slive, J., 2013. "Access to central counterparties: why it matters and how it is changing," Financial Stability Review, Banque de France, issue 17, pages 169-177, April.
    2. Albert Menkveld & Emiliano Pagnotta & Marius Andrei Zoican, 2016. "Does Central Clearing Affect Price Stability? Evidence from Nordic Equity Markets," Working Papers hal-01253702, HAL.
    3. Joshua Slive & Jonathan Witmer & Elizabeth Woodman, 2012. "Liquidity and Central Clearing: Evidence from the CDS Market," Staff Working Papers 12-38, Bank of Canada.
    4. Jean-Sébastien Fontaine & Héctor Pérez Saiz & Joshua Slive, 2012. "When Lower Risk Increases Profit: Competition and Control of a Central Counterparty," Staff Working Papers 12-35, Bank of Canada.

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