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The Global Foreign Exchange Market: Growth and Transformation




Barker examines changes in the foreign exchange market, which is in a period of transition. Since the mid-1990s, three closely inter-related and mutually reinforcing factors--electronic trading platforms, a changing mix of market participants, and computer-driven algorithmic trading strategies--have been accelerating market growth and are creating a profound structural transformation. As the balance of market participation shifts between bank and non-bank accounts, large and small participants, and domestic and global players, the market is adopting some of the characteristics of an "exchange" model and is arguably becoming more liquid and operationally efficient.

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  • William Barker, 2007. "The Global Foreign Exchange Market: Growth and Transformation," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2007(Autumn), pages 4-13.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bcarev:v:2007:y:2007:i:autumn07:p:4-13

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Macdonald, Ryan, 2007. "Canadian and U.S. Real Income Growth Pre and Post 2000: A Reversal of Fortunes," Economic Analysis (EA) Research Paper Series 2007048e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. Fagerberg, Jan, 2000. "Technological progress, structural change and productivity growth: a comparative study," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 393-411, December.
    3. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Gerard A. Pfann, 1996. "Adjustment Costs in Factor Demand," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(3), pages 1264-1292, September.
    4. Jeannine Bailliu & Michael R. King, 2005. "What Drives Movements in Exchange Rates?," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2005(Autumn), pages 27-39.
    5. Robert Lafrance & Lawrence L. Schembri, 2000. "The Exchange Rate, Productivity, and the Standard of Living," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 1999(Winter), pages 17-28.
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    Cited by:

    1. Borgy, V. & Idier, J. & Le Fol, G., 2010. "Liquidity problems in the FX liquid market: Ask for the "BIL"," Working papers 279, Banque de France.
    2. Paola Gallardo & Alexandra Heath, 2009. "Execution methods in foreign exchange markets," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    3. Chen, Shikuan & Chien, Chih-Chung & Chang, Ming-Jen, 2012. "Order flow, bid–ask spread and trading density in foreign exchange markets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 597-612.
    4. Boschen, John F. & Smith, Kimberly J., 2016. "The uncovered interest rate parity anomaly and trading activity by non-dealer financial firms," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 333-342.
    5. Martin D. Gould & Mason A. Porter & Sam D. Howison, 2015. "Quasi-Centralized Limit Order Books," Papers 1502.00680,, revised Oct 2016.
    6. Ding, Liang & Hiltrop, Jonas, 2010. "The electronic trading systems and bid-ask spreads in the foreign exchange market," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 323-345, October.

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