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The Demand for Imported Apple Juice in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Fonsah, Esendugue Greg
  • Muhammad, Andrew

Abstract

This study estimates U.S. demand for imported apple juice by exporting country. Given that China has emerged as the top supplier to the U.S., we focus on the impact of China on competing exporting countries. Results show that U.S. imports from Argentina, Chile, and the rest of the world (ROW) were significantly responsive to apple juice prices in China. U.S. imports from China were significantly responsive to prices in Argentina, Chile and the ROW as well; however, the responsiveness of imports from China to apple juice prices in these countries was relatively smaller than the responsiveness of imports from these countries to China’s price.

Suggested Citation

  • Fonsah, Esendugue Greg & Muhammad, Andrew, 2008. "The Demand for Imported Apple Juice in the United States," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 39(1), March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlofdr:55606
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/55606
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nzaku, Kilungu & Houston, Jack E. & Fonsah, Esendugue Greg, 2012. "A Dynamic Application of the AIDS Model to Import Demand for Tropical Fresh Fruits in the USA," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126721, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Nzaku, Kilungu & Houston, Jack E., 2009. "Dynamic Estimation of U.S. Demand for Fresh Vegetable Imports," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 52209, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Assem Abu Hatab, 2016. "Demand relationships in orange exports to Russia: a differential demand system approach focusing on Egypt," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-16, December.

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