IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/afj/journl/v13y2011i1p47-63.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Determinants of Excess Liquidity in Tanzanian

Author

Listed:
  • Jehovaness Aikaeli

    () (University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania)

Abstract

Among the current concerns in Tanzania is that banks are awash with liquidity notwithstanding the private sector high demand for credit. Excess liquidity constrains banks’ productivity/efficiency; and on the other hand, strangles the share of credit allocated to the private sector, thereafter upsetting economic growth. To determine the causes of excess liquidity, autoregressive distributed lag model is employed. The findings suggest that high cost of funds, credit risks, volatility of deposit holders’ cash preference, inter alia, perpetuated accumulation of excess liquidity in commercial banks. Important policy implications on price stability, risks minimization, proper supervision and optimal liquidity management are highlighted.

Suggested Citation

  • Jehovaness Aikaeli, 2011. "Determinants of Excess Liquidity in Tanzanian," The African Finance Journal, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 13(1), pages 47-63.
  • Handle: RePEc:afj:journl:v:13:y:2011:i:1:p:47-63
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.journals.co.za/ej/ejour_finj.html
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "Mobile Phone Penetration, Mobile Banking and Inclusive Development in Africa," The African Finance Journal, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 18(1), pages 34-52.
    2. Nguyen, Vu Hong Thai & Boateng, Agyenim, 2015. "An analysis of involuntary excess reserves, monetary policy and risk-taking behaviour of Chinese Banks," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 63-72.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Excess liquidity; Commercial banks; Reserves; Deposits;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:afj:journl:v:13:y:2011:i:1:p:47-63. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kirk De Doncker). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/afrgrza.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.