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Should Cash Transfers Be Conditional? Conditionality, Preventive Care, and Health Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Orazio P. Attanasio
  • Veruska Oppedisano
  • Marcos Vera-Hernández

Abstract

We study a Conditional Cash Transfer program in which the cash transfers to the mother only depend on the fulfillment of the national preventive visit schedule by her children born before she registered in the program. We estimate that preventive visits of children born after the mother registered in the program are 50 percent lower because they are excluded from the conditionality requirement. Using the same variation, we also show that attendance to preventive care improves children health. (JEL H23, I12, I18, I38, J13, J16, O15)

Suggested Citation

  • Orazio P. Attanasio & Veruska Oppedisano & Marcos Vera-Hernández, 2015. "Should Cash Transfers Be Conditional? Conditionality, Preventive Care, and Health Outcomes," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 35-52, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aejapp:v:7:y:2015:i:2:p:35-52
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/app.20130126
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Fiorella Benedetti & Pablo Ibarrarán & Patrick J. McEwan, 2016. "Do Education and Health Conditions Matter in a Large Cash Transfer? Evidence from a Honduran Experiment," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(4), pages 759-793.
    2. Guido Neidhöfer & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, 2017. "The long(er)-term impacts of Chile Solidario on human capital and labour income," WIDER Working Paper Series 201, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Sebastian Martinez & Pablo Celhay & Cecilia Vidal & Julia Johannsen, 2017. "Paying Patients for Prenatal Care: The Effect of a Small Cash Transfer on Stillbirths and Survival," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8475, Inter-American Development Bank.
    4. Michael Levere & Gayatri Acharya & Prashant Bharadwaj, 2016. "The Role of Information and Cash Transfers on Early Childhood Development: Evidence from Nepal," NBER Working Papers 22640, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Reis, Hugo, 2015. "Girls' Schooling Choices and Home Production: Evidence from Pakistan," IZA Discussion Papers 9562, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Fiorella Benedetti & Pablo Ibarrarán & Patrick J. McEwan, 2016. "Do Education and Health Conditions Matter in a Large Cash Transfer? Evidence from a Honduran Experiment," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(4), pages 759-793.
    7. Noemi Pace & Silvio Daidone & Benjamin Davis & Luca Pellerano, 2016. "Does “soft conditionality” increase the impact of cash transfers on desired outcomes? Evidence from a randomized control trial in Lesotho," Working Papers 2016:33, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    8. Silva,Joana C. G. & Morgandi,Matteo & Levin,Victoria, 2016. "Trust in government and support for redistribution," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7675, The World Bank.
    9. Jones, Nicola & Samuels, Fiona, 2015. "The role of cash transfers in maximising schools’ protective effects for children in extreme settings: An ecological approach," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 217-225.
    10. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:498-517 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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