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Market Trade in Patents and the Rise of a Class of Specialized Inventors in the 19th-Century United States

Author

Listed:
  • Kenneth L. Sokoloff
  • Naomi R. Lamoreaux

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenneth L. Sokoloff & Naomi R. Lamoreaux, 2001. "Market Trade in Patents and the Rise of a Class of Specialized Inventors in the 19th-Century United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 39-44, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:91:y:2001:i:2:p:39-44
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.91.2.39
    as

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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.91.2.39
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Khan, B. Zorina, 1995. "Property Rights and Patent Litigation in Early Nineteenth-Century America," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(01), pages 58-97, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The Patent System: Mend, Don’t End
      by Jonathan Rothwell in Up Front on 2013-02-11 22:00:00

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Saiz, Patricio & Amengual, Rafael, 2016. "Knowledge Disclosure, Patent Management, and the Four-Stroke Engine Business," Working Papers in Economic History 2016/02, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
    2. Hellmann, Thomas, 2007. "The role of patents for bridging the science to market gap," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 63(4), pages 624-647, August.
    3. repec:eee:indorg:v:56:y:2018:i:c:p:168-203 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. de Rassenfosse, Gaétan & Palangkaraya, Alfons & Webster, Elizabeth, 2016. "Why do patents facilitate trade in technology? Testing the disclosure and appropriation effects," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(7), pages 1326-1336.
    5. Deepak Hegde & David C. Mowery & Stuart J. H. Graham, 2009. "Pioneering Inventors or Thicket Builders: Which U.S. Firms Use Continuations in Patenting?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 55(7), pages 1214-1226, July.
    6. Stuart Graham & Galen Hancock, 2014. "The USPTO economics research agenda," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 335-344, June.
    7. Jackie Krafft, 2006. "Business history and the organization of industry," Post-Print hal-00211780, HAL.
    8. repec:spr:jknowl:v:8:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s13132-016-0418-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Krafft, Jackie, 2004. "Frontières de la firme et de l’industrie : Les perspectives récentes issues de la rencontre entre l’histoire industrielle et l’économie industrielle," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 80(1), pages 109-135, Mars.
    10. Aaron K. Chatterji & Kira R. Fabrizio, 2016. "Does the market for ideas influence the rate and direction of innovative activity? Evidence from the medical device industry," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(3), pages 447-465, March.
    11. Arora, Ashish & Gambardella, Alfonso, 2010. "The Market for Technology," Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, Elsevier.
    12. repec:eee:respol:v:46:y:2017:i:9:p:1644-1654 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Grimpe, Christoph & Sofka, Wolfgang, 2016. "Complementarities in the search for innovation—Managing markets and relationships," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 2036-2053.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • N31 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • N71 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913

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