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Do Workers Make Good Neighbours? The Impact of Local Employment on Young Male and Female Entrants to the Labour Market

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  • Matthieu Solignac
  • Maxime Tô

Abstract

This paper investigates the social endogenous effect linking the employment probability of young workers entering the labour market to the local employment rate. We focus on the transition from school to work, using a representative sample of youths leaving the French educational system in 1998 and 2004. We identify the causal effect of local employment rate using a neighbourhood fixed-effect strategy (Bayer et al, 2007). We provide evidence that the within-neighbourhood random allocation assumption is likely to hold. The results show that an individual's own employment is strongly affected by the share of working people in their neighbourhood, estimates being higher for high-school dropouts. Results also reveal gender differences, suggesting that young people are more sensitive to same-sex neighbours.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthieu Solignac & Maxime Tô, 2018. "Do Workers Make Good Neighbours? The Impact of Local Employment on Young Male and Female Entrants to the Labour Market," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 130, pages 167-198.
  • Handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:2018:i:130:p:167-198
    DOI: 10.15609/annaeconstat2009.130.0167
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    File URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.15609/annaeconstat2009.130.0167
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Neighbourhood Effects; Local Social Interactions; Unemployment; Female Employment.;

    JEL classification:

    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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