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An Imperfectly Competitive Open Economy with Sequential Bargaining in the Labour Market


  • Huw David Dixon
  • Michele Santoni


We consider a three sector small open economy with a monopolistic non traded sector, a competitive traded good sector, and a capital good sector. In both the consumer good sector, there are enterprise unions that bargain sequentially over wages and employment as in Manning [1987]. This approach encompasses the standard monopoly union, right-to-manage and efficient bargain bargaining models. We consider first the effects of bargaining strengths at each stage on overall macroeconomic equilibrium. Here we find strong general equilibrium spillover effects: bargaining strength in one sector affecting the other sectors. Second, we consider the influence of the bargaining process on the welfare analysis of fiscal policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Huw David Dixon & Michele Santoni, 1995. "An Imperfectly Competitive Open Economy with Sequential Bargaining in the Labour Market," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 37-38, pages 293-317.
  • Handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:1995:i:37-38:p:293-317

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Benhabib Jess & Farmer Roger E. A., 1994. "Indeterminacy and Increasing Returns," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 19-41, June.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    3. Tjalling C. Koopmans, 1963. "On the Concept of Optimal Economic Growth," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 163, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    4. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1990. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 92-96, May.
    5. Rebelo, Sergio, 1991. "Long-Run Policy Analysis and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 500-521, June.
    6. Boldrin, Michele, 1992. "Dynamic externalities, multiple equilibria, and growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 198-218, December.
    7. Gali, Jordi, 1994. "Monopolistic competition, endogenous markups, and growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 748-756, April.
    8. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. José M. Martín-Moreno, 1999. "Consumo público e inflación dual," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 23(2), pages 173-202, May.
    2. Luís F. Costa, "undated". "Product Differentiation, Fiscal Policy, and Free Entry," Discussion Papers 98/20, Department of Economics, University of York.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance
    • J5 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining


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