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Is information and communication technology (ICT) the right strategy for growth in Mexico?

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  • Caudillo Sanchez, Francisco
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    Abstract

    Although empirical evidence available suggests that information and communication technologies (ICT) have positively contributed to important sectors of the Mexican economy, it is still unknown to which extent ICT have truly contributed to productivity among these sectors. The increasing implementation and imports of ICT technologies, the growing demand for ICT-skilled human capital and training, the rising level of wages and the large demand and adoption of these technologies seem to indicate a positive correlation between ICT implementation and economic growth in Mexico. To answer whether ICT may be a key strategy for economic growth in the Mexican economy is the main purpose of this work. --

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration in its series Freiberg Working Papers with number 2006,17.

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    Date of creation: 2006
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:tufwps:200617

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    Related research

    Keywords: Information technology; total factor productivity; growth; knowledge; human capital; technology diffusion;

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    1. Markusen, James R. & Rutherford, Tom, 2004. "Learning on the Quick and Cheap: Gains from Trade Through Imported Expertise," CEPR Discussion Papers 4504, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Elena Bellini & Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano & Dino Pinelli, 2003. "The ICT Revolution: Opportunities and Risks for the Mezzogiorno," Working Papers 2003.86, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    3. Schiff, Maurice & Wang, Yanling, 2003. "Regional integration and technology diffusion : the case of the North America free trade agreement," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3132, The World Bank.
    4. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages S71-102, October.
    5. Cohen, Daniel & Garibaldi, Pietro & Scarpetta, Stefano (ed.), 2004. "The ICT Revolution: Productivity Differences and the Digital Divide," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199270118, October.
    6. Vinod K. Goel & Ekaterina Koryukin & Mohini Bhatia & Priyanka Agarwal, 2004. "Innovation Systems : World Bank Support of Science and Technology Development," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15026, July.
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