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Does the Digital Divide Matter? The Role of Information and Communication Technology in Cross-country Level and Growth Estimates?

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Author Info

  • Leonardo Becchetti

    ()
    (University of Rome II - Faculty of Economics)

  • Fabrizio Adriani

    ()
    (University of Rome II - Centre for International Studies on Economic Growth (CEIS))

Abstract

The bulk of Information and Communication Technology is made of weightless, implementable and infinitely reproducible knowledge products (such as software and databases). These products are transferred by telephone lines, accessed through internet hosts and processed and exchanged through personal computers. In this work, the coefficient of the labor augmenting factor in the aggregate production function has been estimated using proxies of variables crucially affecting the diffusion of (non rivalrous and almost non excludable) knowledge products. This specification provides interesting answers to some of the open issues in the existing growth literature. The most recent information, even though available for a limited period, shows that telephone lines, personal computers, mobile phones and internet hosts significantly affect levels and growth of income per worker across countries. The result is robust to changes in sample composition, econometric specification and estimation approach.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tor Vergata University, CEIS in its series CEIS Research Paper with number 4.

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Length: 30
Date of creation: 07 Jun 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rtv:ceisrp:4

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Postal: CEIS - Centre for Economic and International Studies - Faculty of Economics - University of Rome "Tor Vergata" - Via Columbia, 2 00133 Roma
Phone: +390672595601
Fax: +39062020687
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Web page: http://www.ceistorvergata.it
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Postal: CEIS - Centre for Economic and International Studies - Faculty of Economics - University of Rome "Tor Vergata" - Via Columbia, 2 00133 Roma
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Web: http://www.ceistorvergata.it

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Francesco VENTURINI, 2006. "The Long-Run Impact of ICT," Working Papers 254, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  2. Sophia P. Dimelis & Sotiris K. Papaioannou, 2011. "Technical Efficiency and the Role of ICT: A Comparison of Developed and Developing Countries," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 47(0), pages 40-53, July.
  3. Federico Biagi, 2013. "ICT and Productivity: A Review of the Literature," JRC-IPTS Working Papers on Digital Economy 2013-09, Institute of Prospective Technological Studies, Joint Research Centre.
  4. Francesco VENTURINI, 2008. "Information Technology, Research & Development, or Both? What Really Drives A Nation's Productivity," Working Papers 321, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  5. Ewa Lechman, 2013. "Technology convergence and digital divides. A country-level evidence for the period 2000-2010," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 3, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.
  6. Charles Amo Yartey, 2006. "Financial Development, the Structure of Capital Markets, and the Global Digital Divide," IMF Working Papers 06/258, International Monetary Fund.

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