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Inter-regional Mobility in Europe. A Note on the Cross-Country Evidence

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  • Peter Huber

    (WIFO)

Abstract

This paper uses data on 11 EU countries to explain cross-national differences in internal migration rates. It is found that 89% of the variance in gross migration in current member states can be explained by variations in employment protection, international migration, the share of ownership occupied housing and the average region size of a country. Results concerning net migration rates suggest that although disparities in unemployment are important determinants of net migration, so are employment protection, long-term unemployment and the share of owner occupied housing.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by WIFO in its series WIFO Working Papers with number 221.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: 26 May 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wfo:wpaper:y:2004:i:221

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Keywords: Inter-regional Mobility in Europe. A Note on the Cross-Country Evidence regional Labour Market Adjustment Transition EU Accession;

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References

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  1. Decressin, Jörg & Fatás, Antonio, 1994. "Regional Labour Market Dynamics in Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 1085, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Puhani, Patrick A., 1999. "Labour mobility - an adjustment mechanism in Euroland? Empirical evidence for Western Germany, France and Italy," ZEW Discussion Papers 99-47, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  3. Faini, Riccardo & Galli, Giampaolo & Gennari, Pietro & Rossi, Fulvio, 1997. "An empirical puzzle: Falling migration and growing unemployment differentials among Italian regions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 571-579, April.
  4. Borjas, George J., 1999. "The economic analysis of immigration," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 28, pages 1697-1760 Elsevier.
  5. repec:ese:iserwp:99-16 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Xavier Sala-I-Martin & Gernot Doppelhofer & Ronald I. Miller, 2004. "Determinants of Long-Term Growth: A Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimates (BACE) Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 813-835, September.
  7. Olivier Blanchard & Justin Wolfers, 1999. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7282, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Cameron, Gavin & Muellbauer, John, 1998. "The Housing Market and Regional Commuting and Migration Choices," CEPR Discussion Papers 1945, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Maurice Obstfeld & Giovanni Peri, 1998. "Regional non-adjustment and fiscal policy," Economic Policy, CEPR & CES & MSH, vol. 13(26), pages 205-259, 04.
  10. Bode, Eckhardt & Zwing, Sebastian, 1998. "Interregionale Arbeitskräftewanderungen: theoretische Erklärungsansätze und empirischer Befund," Kiel Working Papers 877, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  11. Stark, Oded & Taylor, J Edward, 1991. "Migration Incentives, Migration Types: The Role of Relative Deprivation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(408), pages 1163-78, September.
  12. Chiara Bentivogli & Patrizio Pagano, 1999. "Regional Disparities and Labour Mobility: the Euro-11 versus the USA," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 13(3), pages 737-760, 09.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Christian Dreger & Hans-Eggert Reimers, 2009. "Hysteresis in the development of unemployment: the EU and US experience," Spanish Economic Review, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 267-276, December.
  2. Paul Cavelaars & Jeroen Hessel, 2007. "Regional Labour Mobility in the European Union: Adjustment Mechanism or Disturbance?," DNB Working Papers 137, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  3. Gabriele Tondl & Peter Huber, 2011. "Migration and Regional Convergence in the European Union," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1761, European Regional Science Association.
  4. Saarivirta, Toni & Consoli, Davide, 2007. "Where Did They Go? A Study on Newly Established Universities and Graduate Mobility in Finland," MPRA Paper 11377, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Marga Peeters, 2012. "Better Safe than Sorry - Individual Risk-free Pension Schemes in the European Union," Contemporary Economics, University of Finance and Management in Warsaw, vol. 6(3), September.
  6. Mihails Hazans, 2003. "Determinants of Inter-Regional Migration in the Baltic Countries," ERSA conference papers ersa03p354, European Regional Science Association.
  7. Lutz Schneider & Alexander Kubis, 2010. "Are there Gender-specific Preferences for Location Factors? A Grouped Conditional Logit-Model of Interregional Migration Flows in Germany," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 130(2), pages 143-168.
  8. Stephen Machin & Panu Pelkonen & Kjell Salvanes, 2008. "Education and mobility," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28277, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  9. Huber, Peter, 2004. "Inter-regional mobility in the accession countries : a comparison with EU15 member states," Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung - Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 37(4), pages 393-408.
  10. Peeters, Marga, 2011. "“Better Safe than Sorry” - Individual Risk-free Pension Schemes in the European Union - Macroeconomic Benefits, the Mobile Working Citizen’s Perspective and Why Nots," MPRA Paper 33571, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. repec:iab:iabzaf:v:37:i:4:p:393-408 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Silaghi, Monica Ioana & Ghatak, Subrata, 2011. "Why do not They Move from Rural to Urban Areas? Inter-Regional Migration in Romania," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(1), pages 143-158, March.
  13. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Tobias Ketterer, 2011. "Do we follow the money? The drivers of migration across regions in the EU," ERSA conference papers ersa11p191, European Regional Science Association.
  14. Napolitano, Oreste & Bonasia, Mariangela, 2010. "Determinants of different internal migration trends: the Italian experience," MPRA Paper 21734, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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