Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Is inequality in Africa really different ?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Milanovic, Branko

Abstract

High inequality in Africa is something of a paradox: Africa should be a low-inequality continent according to the Kuznets hypothesis (because African countries are poor and agriculture-based), and also because land (the main asset) is widely shared. The author's hypothesis is that African inequality is politically determined. Yet in the empirical analysis, despite the introduction of several political variables, there is still an inequality-increasing"Africa effect"linked to ethnic fractionalization. The politics, however, may work through ethnic fractionalization, which provides an easy and secure basis for the formation of political groups. Although this is a plausible explanation, it is not fully satisfactory, and the author criticizes it in the concluding section.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/servlet/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2004/01/14/000160016_20040114170052/Rendered/PDF/wps3169.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3169.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 01 Nov 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3169

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
Phone: (202) 477-1234
Email:
Web page: http://www.worldbank.org/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Services&Transfers to Poor; Earth Sciences&GIS; Economic Theory&Research; Poverty Impact Evaluation; Human Rights; Inequality; Poverty Impact Evaluation; Governance Indicators; Earth Sciences&GIS; Services&Transfers to Poor;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Beck, Thorsten & Clarke, George & Groff, Alberto & Keefer, Philip & Walsh, Patrick, 2000. "New tools and new tests in comparative political economy - the database of political institutions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2283, The World Bank.
  2. Stephen D. Behrendt & David Eltis & David Richardson, 2001. "The Costs of Coercion: African Agency in the Pre-Modern Atlantic World," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, Economic History Society, vol. 54(3), pages 454-476, 08.
  3. John Luiz, 2006. "The New Partnership for African Development: questions regarding Africa's response to its underdevelopment," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 223-236.
  4. Milanovic, Branko, 1999. "True world income distribution, 1988 and 1993 - first calculations, based on household surveys alone," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2244, The World Bank.
  5. Branko milanovic, 2003. "True world income distribution, 1988 and 1993: First calculation based on household surveys alo," HEW, EconWPA 0305002, EconWPA.
  6. Demery, Lionel & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "Macroeconomic Adjustment and Poverty in Africa: An Emerging Picture," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 39-59, February.
  7. Steven N. Durlauf, 2002. "On the Empirics of Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 459-479, November.
  8. Janvier D. Nkurunziza & Floribert Ngaruko, 2002. "Explaining growth in Burundi: 1960-2000," CSAE Working Paper Series 2002-03, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  9. Alesina, Alberto & Baqir, Reza & Easterly, William, 1999. "Public goods and ethnic divisions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2108, The World Bank.
  10. Anthony Annett, 2000. "Social Fractionalization, Political Instability, and the Size of Government," IMF Working Papers, International Monetary Fund 00/82, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Easterly, W & Levine, R, 1996. "Africa's Growth Tragedy : Policies and Ethnic Divisions," Papers, Harvard - Institute for International Development 536, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
  12. Branko Milanovic & Mark Gradstein & Yvonne Ying, 2003. "Democracy, Ideology And Income Inequality: An Empirical Analysis," Public Economics, EconWPA 0305002, EconWPA.
  13. Alberto Alesina & Enrico Spolaore, 1995. "On the Number and Size of Nations," NBER Working Papers 5050, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Mauro, Paolo, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712, August.
  15. Oleksiy Ivaschenko, 2002. "Growth and Inequality: Evidence from Transitional Economies," CESifo Working Paper Series 746, CESifo Group Munich.
  16. Janvier Nkurunziza & Floribert Ngaruko, 2002. "Explaining Growth in Burundi: 1960-2000," Economics Series Working Papers, University of Oxford, Department of Economics WPS/2002-03, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Fosu, Augustin Kwasi, 2010. "Does inequality constrain poverty reduction programs? Evidence from Africa," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 818-827, November.
  2. Pinto Moreira, Emmanuel & Bayraktar, Nihal, 2005. "A macroeconomic framework for quantifying growth and poverty reduction strategies in Niger," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3506, The World Bank.
  3. Pellicer, Miquel, 2009. "Inequality persistence through vertical vs. horizontal coalitions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 258-266, November.
  4. Moradi, Alexander & Baten, Joerg, 2005. "Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa: New Data and New Insights from Anthropometric Estimates," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1233-1265, August.
  5. Delfin Go & Denis Nikitin & Xiongjian Wang & Heng-fu Zou, 2011. "Poverty and Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa: Literature Survey and Empirical Assessment," CEMA Working Papers, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics 485, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
  6. Sindzingre, Alice, 2005. "Explaining Threshold Effects of Globalization on Poverty: An Institutional Perspective," Working Paper Series, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) RP2005/53, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  7. Murshed, S. Mansoob, 2004. "When Does Natural Resource Abundance Lead to a Resource Curse?," Discussion Papers, International Institute for Environment and Development, Environmental Economics Programme 24137, International Institute for Environment and Development, Environmental Economics Programme.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3169. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.