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The Economic Participation of Adolescent Girls and Young Women : Why Does It Matter?

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  • Andrew Morrison
  • Shwetlena Sabarwal
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/11131/472300BRI0Box31premnote12801PUBLIC1.pdf?sequence=1
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Other Operational Studies with number 11131.

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    Date of creation: Dec 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wboper:11131

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    Related research

    Keywords: Gender - Gender and Development Health; Nutrition and Population - Population Policies Health; Nutrition and Population - Adolescent Health Finance and Financial Sector Development - Access to Finance Education - Primary Education;

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Braunstein, Elissa, 2000. "Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets and International Capital Mobility," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1157-1172, July.
    2. Esther Duflo, 2003. "Grandmothers and Granddaughters: Old-Age Pensions and Intrahousehold Allocation in South Africa," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(1), pages 1-25, June.
    3. Brewer, Laura, 2004. "Youth at risk : the role of skills development in facilitating the transition to work," ILO Working Papers 373389, International Labour Organization.
    4. Skoufias, Emmanuel & Parker, Susan W., 2001. "Conditional cash transfers and their impact on child work and schooling," FCND discussion papers 123, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Francine D. Blau & Adam J. Grossberg, 1990. "Maternal Labor Supply and Children's Cognitive Development," NBER Working Papers 3536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Linda Adair & Eilene Bisgrove & David Guilkey & Socorro Gultiano, 2002. "Effect of childbearing on Filipino women's work hours and earnings," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 625-645.
    7. Schultz, T Paul, 1993. "Mortality Decline in the Low-Income World: Causes and Consequences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 337-42, May.
    8. Adriaan S. Kalwij, 2000. "The effects of female employment status on the presence and number of children," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 221-239.
    9. Mark M. Pitt & Shahidur R. Khandker, 1998. "The Impact of Group-Based Credit Programs on Poor Households in Bangladesh: Does the Gender of Participants Matter?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 958-996, October.
    10. Bina Agarwal, 1997. "''Bargaining'' and Gender Relations: Within and Beyond the Household," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 1-51.
    11. Duncan Thomas & John Strauss & Maria-Helena Henriques, 1991. "How Does Mother's Education Affect Child Height?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 183-211.
    12. Malhotra, Anju & DeGraff, Deborah S., 1997. "Entry versus success in the labor force: Young women's employment in Sri Lanka," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 379-394, March.
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    Cited by:
    1. Sarah Baird & Ephraim Chirwa & Craig McIntosh & Berk Ozler, 2009. "The Short-Term Impacts of as Schooling Cash Transfer Program on the Sexual Behavior of Young Women," Working Papers 2010-10, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.

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