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Child labor handbook

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Author Info

  • Cigno, Alessandro
  • Rosati, Furio C.
  • Tzannatos, Zafiris

Abstract

This paper surveys many aspects and issues of child labor, including its causes and effects as well as policies associated with it. Child labor has come to be considered an expression of poverty, both a cause and an effect of underdevelopment. Child labor cannot be viewed in isolation from educational, health, fertility, and technological issues; and is not necessarily an aberration but a rational household response to an adverse economic environment. With this in mind, the following proposition was supported - that forbidding children to work or making school attendance compulsory without changing the economic environment may, if effectively enforced, leave children worse off. There is a tendency to believe that income redistribution from the rich to the poor is more powerful for reducing child labor than a universal income rise. It is also indicated that child labor cuts across policy boundaries: health, education, labor market, capital security, criminal law, international peace keeping, income growth, and distribution all have a bearing on child labor. Therefore, reducing child labor cannot be regarded as just another policy issue.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Social Protection Discussion Papers with number 25507.

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Date of creation: 31 May 2002
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:hdnspu:25507

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Related research

Keywords: Child Labor; Street Children; Youth and Governance; Children and Youth; Health Monitoring&Evaluation;

References

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  1. Ray, R., 1998. "Analysis of Child Labour in Peru and Pakistan: a Comparative Study," Papers, Tasmania - Department of Economics 1998-05, Tasmania - Department of Economics.
  2. Dasgupta, Partha, 1997. "Nutritional status, the capacity for work, and poverty traps," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 5-37, March.
  3. Cigno, Alessandro & Rosati, Furio C., 1996. "Jointly determined saving and fertility behaviour: Theory, and estimates for Germany, Italy, UK and USA," European Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1561-1589, November.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Klasen, Stephan, 2004. "Gender-Related Indicators of Well-Being," Working Paper Series, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Leonardo Becchetti & Stefano Castriota & Melania Michetti, 2013. "The effect of fair trade affiliation on child schooling: evidence from a sample of Chilean honey producers," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(25), pages 3552-3563, September.
  3. L.Guarcello & F.Mealli & F.Rosati, 2002. "Household Vulnerability and Child Labour: the Effect of Shocks, Credit Rationing and Insurance," UCW Working Paper, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme) 3, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  4. Gianna Claudia Giannelli & Francesca Francavilla, 2007. "The Relation between Child Labour and Mothers’ Work: The Case of India," CHILD Working Papers, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY wp22_07, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
  5. Tzannatos, Zafiris, 2003. "Child labor and school enrollment in Thailand in the 1990s," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 523-536, October.
  6. L. Guarcello & I. Kovrova & F. C. Rosati, 2008. "Child labour as a response to shocks: evidence from Cambodian villages," UCW Working Paper, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme) 37, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  7. Webbink, Ellen & Smits, Jeroen & de Jong, Eelke, 2012. "Hidden Child Labor: Determinants of Housework and Family Business Work of Children in 16 Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 631-642.
  8. Garcia, Luis, 2006. "Oferta de trabajo infantil y el trabajo en los quehaceres del hogar
    [The supply of child labor and household work]
    ," MPRA Paper 31402, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Awan, Masood Sarwar & Waqas, Muhammad & Aslam, Muhammad Amir, 2011. "Why do Parents Make their Children Work? Evidence from Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey," MPRA Paper 31830, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Canals-Cerda, Jose & Ridao-Cano, Cristobal, 2004. "The dynamics of school and work in rural Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 3330, The World Bank.

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