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Corruption in representative democracy

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  • Bannikova, Marina
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    Abstract

    A parliament with n members, distributed among two parties, decides whether to accept or reject a certain proposal. Each member of the parliament votes in favour or against. If there are at least t members in favour, the proposal is accepted; otherwise it is rejected. A non-member of the parliament, the briber, is interested in having the proposal accepted. To this end, he is willing to bribe members to induce them to vote in favour. It is compared a parliament with party discipline, where members vote according to the party line, and a parliament without party discipline, where members vote according to their own opinion. The paper determines, for given values of n and t , the average number of members that the briber has to bribe in each case (with the average taken with respect to all the possible allocations of members between parties and their votes, and also with respect to those allocations inducing the briber to bribe). The results show that a parliament with parties with party discipline is more costly for the briber to be bribed.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2072/213635
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2072/213635.

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    Date of creation: 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:urv:wpaper:2072/213635

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    Keywords: Parlaments; Corrupció; Disciplina de partit; Subornació; 32 - Política;

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    1. Torsten Persson & Guido Tabellini & Francesco Trebbi, 2001. "Electoral Rules and Corruption," CESifo Working Paper Series 416, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Daniel Lederman & Norman V. Loayza & Rodrigo R. Soares, 2005. "Accountability And Corruption: Political Institutions Matter," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17, pages 1-35, 03.
    3. Myerson, Roger B., 1999. "Theoretical comparisons of electoral systems," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 671-697, April.
    4. Myerson Roger B., 1993. "Effectiveness of Electoral Systems for Reducing Government Corruption: A Game-Theoretic Analysis," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 118-132, January.
    5. Rick Stapenhurst & Niall Johnston & Riccardo Pelizzo, 2006. "The Role of Parliaments in Curbing Corruption," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7106, October.
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