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(Re)Distribution of Personal Incomes, Education and Economic Performance Across Countries

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  • Rehme, Gunther

Abstract

In many OECD countries income inequality has risen, but surprisingly redistribution as well. The theory attributes this partly to the redistributive effect of education spending. In the model income inequality and growth depend in an inverted U-shaped way on education. To maintain a given level of human capital it is shown that a less efficient schooling technology requires more resources, which lowers pre-tax and post-tax income inequality as well as growth. Using consistently defined income data from the Luxembourg Income Study suggests that there is a negative relationship between growth and income inequality in rich countries. It is argued that using some unadjusted inequality measures in growth regressions may yield estimates that are biased upwards. The evidence suggests that a rich country would raise growth with lower pre-tax and post-tax inequality if it spent more on education.

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File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/stc/repec/pdfs/rp2002/dp2002-34.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) in its series Working Paper Series with number UNU-WIDER Research Paper DP2002/34.

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Length: 48 pages
Date of creation: 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:dp2002-34

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Keywords: Growth; Redistribution; Inequality; Education;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Glomm, Gerhard & Kaganovich, Michael, 2008. "Social security, public education and the growth-inequality relationship," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(6), pages 1009-1034, August.
  2. Timothy M Smeeding, 2002. "Globalisation, Inequality and the Rich Countries of the G-20: Evidence from the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS)," RBA Annual Conference Volume, in: David Gruen & Terry O'Brien & Jeremy Lawson (ed.), Globalisation, Living Standards and Inequality: Recent Progress and Continuing Challenges Reserve Bank of Australia.
  3. Niko Gobbin & Glenn Rayp, 2004. "Inequality and Growth: Does Time Change Anything," Development and Comp Systems 0402005, EconWPA.
  4. Klump, Rainer & Prüfer, Patricia, 2005. "How to prioritise policies for poverty reduction: Applying Bayesian Model Averaging to Vietnam," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Kiel 2005 27, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.

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