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The Impact of the Food and Financial Crises on Child Mortality: The case of sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Giovanni Andrea Cornia
  • Luca Tiberti
  • Stefano Rosignoli
  • UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre

Abstract

The years 2000-2007 witnessed an average decline in U5MR in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) faster than that recorded during the prior two decades, including in countries with high HIV prevalence rates due to the spread of preventative and curative measures. Despite their gravity, a comprehensive analysis of the impact of the 2008-2009 crises on child mortality is still lacking, and estimates of the number of additional child deaths caused by the crises in SSA vary enormously.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre in its series Innocenti Working Papers with number inwopa633.

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Length: 52
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa633

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Keywords: economic crisis; food shortage; infant mortality;

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References

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  1. Wagstaff, Adam, 2002. "Inequalities in health in developing countries - swimming against the tide?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2795, The World Bank.
  2. Bhalotra, Sonia R., 2007. "Fatal Fluctuations? Cyclicality in Infant Mortality in India," IZA Discussion Papers 3086, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  4. Sami Bibi & John Cockburn & Luca Tiberti & Massa Coulibaly, 2009. "The Impact of the Increase in Food Prices on Child Poverty and the Policy Response in Mali," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa09/66, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
  5. Christopher J. Ruhm, 1996. "Are Recessions Good For Your Health?," NBER Working Papers 5570, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  7. Alberto Minujin & Enrique Delamonica, 2003. "Mind the Gap! Widening Child Mortality Disparities," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 397-418.
  8. Christina Paxson & Norbert Schady, 2004. "Child Health and Economic Crisis in Peru," Working Papers 242, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
  9. Isabel Ortiz & Jingqing Chai & Matthew Cummins & Gabriel Vergara, 2010. "Prioritizing Expenditures for a Recovery for All: A Rapid Review of Public Expenditures in 126 Developing," Working papers 1007, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
  10. Sarah Baird & Jed Friedman & Norbert Schady, 2011. "Aggregate Income Shocks and Infant Mortality in the Developing World," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 847-856, August.
  11. Peter C.B. Phillips & Joon Y. Park, 1986. "On the Formulation of Wald Tests of Nonlinear Restrictions," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 801, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  12. Cornia, Giovanni Andrea & Menchini, Leonardo, 2006. "Health Improvements and Health Inequality during the Last 40 Years," Working Paper Series RP2006/10, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  13. Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Stefano Rosignoli & Luca Tiberti, 2009. "Did globalisation affect health status? A simulation exercise," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(8), pages 1083-1101.
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