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Returns to Apprenticeship in Canada

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  • Boothby, Daniel
  • Drewes, Torben
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    Abstract

    The paper exploits the newly available Census data on the earnings of individuals in the apprenticeable trades to examine the returns to apprenticeship training. Only a small minority of males work in these trades, concentrated in the construction, production and mechanical trades where their weekly earnings premia over completed high school range from 9 to 14 percent. An even smaller minority of women report working in apprenticeable trades and it appears that many of them mistakenly report having apprenticed. In the largest single trade for women, personal services and culinary arts, the earnings premium is actually negative, although weekly earnings compare more favourably against the earnings of women without completed high school. Given reasonably large returns for men, late entry into apprenticeships is a puzzling phenomenon requiring further investigation.

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    File URL: http://www.clsrn.econ.ubc.ca/workingpapers/CLSRN%20Working%20Paper%20no.%2070%20-%20Boothby%20and%20Drewes.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Vancouver School of Economics in its series CLSSRN working papers with number clsrn_admin-2010-36.

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    Length: 31 pages
    Date of creation: 28 Dec 2010
    Date of revision: 28 Dec 2010
    Handle: RePEc:ubc:clssrn:clsrn_admin-2010-36

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    Web page: http://www.clsrn.econ.ubc.ca/

    Related research

    Keywords: Human Capital; Wage Differentials; Canada;

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    1. Josef Fersterer & Jörn-Steffen Pischke & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2008. "Returns to apprenticeship training in Austria: evidence from failed firms," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19380, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Josef Fersterer & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2008. "Returns to Apprenticeship Training in Austria: Evidence from Failed Firms," CEE Discussion Papers 0088, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
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