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Cyclical Government Spending, Income Inequality and Welfare in Small Open Economies

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  • Paul McNelis

    (Fordham University)

  • Guay Lim

    (University of Melbourne)

Abstract

This paper compares the effects of pro and counter-cyclical government spending on income inequality and welfare in a small open economy. We examine the consequences of alternative government spending rules following shocks to productivity, domestic interest rates, terms of trade and export demand. The simulated results show that the type of spending rule makes negligible difference to welfare, in the face of domestic or external shocks. However, pro-cyclical government spending reduces income inequality by more than counter-cyclical spending behavior across different shocks and alternative specifications for domestic production.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2009 Meeting Papers with number 300.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed009:300

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  1. Cecilia García-Pe�Alosa & Stephen J. Turnovsky, 2007. "Growth, Income Inequality, and Fiscal Policy: What Are the Relevant Trade-offs?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(2-3), pages 369-394, 03.
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  3. Turnovsky, Stephen J. & Garci­a-Peñalosa, Cecilia, 2008. "Distributional dynamics in a neoclassical growth model: The role of elastic labor supply," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1399-1431, May.
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  8. Amartya Lahiri & Rajesh Singh & Carlos A. Vegh, 2007. "Optimal Exchange Rate Regimes: Turning Mundell-Fleming's Dictum on its Head," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 54(3), pages 249-270, September.
  9. Ethan Ilzetzki & Carlos A. Vegh, 2008. "Procyclical Fiscal Policy in Developing Countries: Truth or Fiction?," NBER Working Papers 14191, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Atkinson, Anthony B., 1970. "On the measurement of inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 244-263, September.
  11. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1975. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 64, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  12. Jonathan Heathcote, 2003. "Fiscal Policy with Heterogeneous Agents and Incomplete Markets," Working Papers gueconwpa~03-03-23, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.
  13. Scott Hendry & Wai-Ming Ho & Kevin Moran, 2003. "Simple Monetary Policy Rules in an Open-Economy, Limited-Participation Model," Working Papers 03-38, Bank of Canada.
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