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Explaining Procyclical Fiscal Policy in African Countries †

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  • John Thornton

Abstract

Simple time series regressions for 37 low-income African countries during 1960--2004 suggest that government consumption is highly procyclical, with consumption responding more than proportionately to fluctuations in output in many cases. The results from a cross-country specification suggest that government consumption is more procyclical in those African countries that are more reliant on foreign aid inflows and that are less corrupt, and that it is less procyclical in countries with unequal income distribution and that are more democratic. These results contrast with those from recent research using data sets that comprise a more diverse groups of countries in terms of geography and income levels. Copyright 2008 The author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Centre for the Study of African Economies. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE) in its journal Journal of African Economies.

Volume (Year): 17 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 451-464

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Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:17:y:2008:i:3:p:451-464

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Cited by:
  1. Sampawende Jules TAPSOBA & Sylviane GUILLAUMONT JEANNENEY, 2009. "Pro cyclicité de la politique budgétaire et surveillance multilatérale dans les unions monétaires africaines," Working Papers 200904, CERDI.
  2. Ahmed, Abdullahi D. & Suardi, Sandy, 2009. "Macroeconomic Volatility, Trade and Financial Liberalization in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1623-1636, October.
  3. Marius Ikpe & Alwell Nteegah, 2013. "Value Added Tax and price stability in Nigeria: A partial equilibrium analysis," European Journal of Government and Economics, Europa Grande, vol. 2(2), pages 137-147, December.
  4. Abbott, Andrew & Jones, Philip, 2012. "Budget deficits and social protection: Cyclical government expenditure in the OECD," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 909-911.
  5. David L. Bevan, 2010. "Fiscal policy issues for Tanzania," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 36380, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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