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Who Gains the Most in Preferential Trade Agreements?

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Abstract

Using recent extensive data of bilateral trade in manufacturing, we study the relations between trade flows, each country’s technological levels, and geographic barriers. Then, we calibrate the equilibrium of a general equilibrium model to explore how a Trans-Pacific Partnership affects each country’s welfare and trade flows. We decompose the total change of trade flows from member countries into income effects and substitution effects, and investigate the factors that affect trade flows. We demonstrate that a positive coalition externality could exist in that some nonmember countries could gain more than member countries and further investigate under which circumstances it arises.

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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia in its series Discussion Papers Series with number 475.

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Date of creation: 17 Jan 2013
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Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:475

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  1. David Hummels & Jun Ishii & Kei-Mu Yi, 1999. "The nature and growth of vertical specialization in world trade," Staff Reports 72, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  2. Helpman, Elhanan & Antras, Pol & Aghion, Philippe, 2007. "Negotiating Free Trade," Scholarly Articles 3351239, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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  5. John B. Burbidge & James A. DePater & Gordon M. Myers & Abhijit Sengupta, 1996. "A Coalition-formation Approach to Equilibrium Federations and Trading Block s," Department of Economics Working Papers 1996-05, McMaster University.
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  7. Anderson, James E, 1979. "A Theoretical Foundation for the Gravity Equation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 106-16, March.
  8. Alvarez, Fernando & Lucas, Robert Jr., 2007. "General equilibrium analysis of the Eaton-Kortum model of international trade," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(6), pages 1726-1768, September.
  9. Baier, Scott L. & Bergstrand, Jeffrey H., 2007. "Do free trade agreements actually increase members' international trade?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 72-95, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Juyoung Cheong & Shino Takayama & Terence Yeo, 2013. "Preferential Trade Agreements and Welfare: General Equilibrium Analysis," Discussion Papers Series 482, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.

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