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Africa's statistical tragedy: best statistics, best government effectiveness

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  • Kodila-Tedika, Oasis

Abstract

We analyze the effect of the Statistical Capacity on government effectiveness/efficiency, using a cross-sectional and panel data for a sample of 48 countries African for a period of 2003-2008.The results show that Statistical Capacity positively affects government effectiveness/efficiency. The positive effect of Statistical Capacity is robust to controlling for other determinants of institutional quality and number of estimation techniques.It follows that countries with higher Statistical Capacity levels enjoy institution of better qualitythan countries with low levels of Statistical Capacity.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 40674.

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Date of creation: 15 Aug 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:40674

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Keywords: Sub-Saharan Africa; Institution; Statistical Capacity; Information; Government effectiveness;

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References

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  1. Simon Johnson & William Larson & Chris Papageorgiou & Arvind Subramanian, 2009. "Is Newer Better? Penn World Table Revisions and Their Impact on Growth Estimates," NBER Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc 15455, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. David E. Sahn & David Stifel, 2003. "Exploring Alternative Measures of Welfare in the Absence of Expenditure Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 49(4), pages 463-489, December.
  3. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1977. "Rules Rather Than Discretion: The Inconsistency of Optimal Plans," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 473-91, June.
  4. Stifel, David & Christiaensen, Luc, 2006. "Tracking poverty over time in the absence of comparable consumption data," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 3810, The World Bank.
  5. Kenneth Harttgen & Stephan Klasen & Sebastian Vollmer, 2013. "An African Growth Miracle? Or: What do Asset Indices Tell Us About Trends in Economic Performance?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59, pages S37-S61, October.
  6. Angus Deaton & Alan Heston, 2010. "Understanding PPPs and PPP-Based National Accounts," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 2(4), pages 1-35, October.
  7. Xavier Sala-i-Martin & Maxim Pinkovskiy, 2010. "African Poverty is Falling...Much Faster than You Think!," NBER Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc 15775, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Morten Jerven, 2011. "Growth, Stagnation or Retrogression? On the Accuracy of Economic Observations, Tanzania, 1961–2001," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 20(3), pages 377-394, June.
  9. Morten Jerven, 2010. "Random Growth in Africa? Lessons from an Evaluation of the Growth Evidence on Botswana, Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia, 1965-1995," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 274-294.
  10. Morten Jerven, 2011. "Counting the Bottom Billion," World Economics, World Economics, Economic & Financial Publishing, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, World Economics, Economic & Financial Publishing, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 12(4), pages 35-52, October.
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Why you want good national statistics
    by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2012-08-27 14:50:00
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Cited by:
  1. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2013. "Poor Numbers: explanation of Africa's statistical tragedy
    [Pauvreté de chiffres : explication de la tragédie statistique africaine]
    ," MPRA Paper, University Library of Munich, Germany 43734, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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