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Australia's Carbon Tax: A Sheep in Wolf's Clothing?

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  • Spash, Clive L.
  • Lo, Alex Y.

Abstract

The Australian Government has produced a CO2-equivalent tax proposal with a difference, it is a short prelude to an emission trading scheme that will allow the increasing rate of emissions to continue, while being a net cost to the Treasury. That cost extends to allowing major emitters to make guaranteed windfall profits from pollution permits. The emission trading scheme suffers numerous problems, but the issues raised show taxes can also be watered down and made ineffectual through concessions. Taxpayers will get no assets from the billions of dollars to be spent buying-off the coal generators or other polluters. The scheme hopes to stimulate private investors to create an additional 12 percent in renewable electricity generation by 2020. A serious emissions reducing alternative would be to create a nationalised electricity sector with 100 percent renewable energy within a decade. We explore the difficulties of implementing meaningful greenhouse gas taxes in Australia.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 33997.

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Date of creation: 03 Oct 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:33997

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Keywords: greenhouse gases; taxation; emission trading; climate change; regulation; renewable energy; Australia;

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  1. Löschel, Andreas, 2001. "Technological change in economic models of environmental policy: a survey," ZEW Discussion Papers 01-62, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
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