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Does the Way in which Students Use Computers Matter for their Performance?

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  • Ponzo, Michela

Abstract

In this paper we investigate possible differences in student performance depending on the frequency and the type of computer usage both at home and at school of 15-years-old Italian students. Using the PISA 2006 dataset and controlling for a wide range of individual and school characteristics, our results suggest that students using the computer at home very often obtain higher test scores than those who never use it. More importantly, we find a significant positive correlation between student achievement and the use of computer at home as educational/learning device. Focusing on the frequency of computer usage at school, it emerges that student achievement increases with the intensity of computer use but the effect becomes smaller the more often they use the computer and even negative when students use the computer at school almost every day

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/25483/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 25483.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25483

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Related research

Keywords: Educational production function; Computers at home; Computers at school; Students achievement; PISA.;

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  1. Cecilia E. Rouse & Alan B. Krueger, 2004. "Putting Computerized Instruction to the Test: A Randomized Evaluation of a "Scientifically-based" Reading Program," NBER Working Papers 10315, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Borghans, Lex & ter Weel, Bas, 2004. "Are computer skills the new basic skills? The returns to computer, writing and math skills in Britain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 85-98, February.
  3. Thomas Fuchs & Ludger Wossmann, 2004. "Computers and student learning: bivariate and multivariate evidence on the availability and use of computers at home and at school," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 47(3-4), pages 359-386.
  4. M. De Paola & V. Scoppa, 2007. "Returns to skills, incentives to study and optimal educational standards," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 92(3), pages 229-262, December.
  5. Bratti, Massimiliano & Checchi, Daniele & Filippin, Antonio, 2007. "Territorial Differences in Italian Students’ Mathematical Competencies: Evidence from PISA 2003," IZA Discussion Papers 2603, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Joshua Angrist & Victor Lavy, 2002. "New Evidence on Classroom Computers and Pupil Learning," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 735-765, October.
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