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Grades, gender, and encouragement: A regression discontinuity analysis

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  • Owen, Ann L.

Abstract

This study employs a regression discontinuity design in order to provide direct evidence on the effects of grades earned in economics principles classes on the decision to major in economics and finds a differential effect for male and female students. Specifically, for female students, receiving an “A” for a final grade in the first economics class is associated with a meaningful increase in the probability of majoring in economics, even after controlling for the numerical grade earned in the class. This suggests that, for female students, the feedback that is embedded in the course letter grade has an encouragement effect on their decision to study economics further. It finds no evidence of a similar effect for male students.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/11586/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 11586.

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Date of creation: Oct 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:11586

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Keywords: economics majors; grades; gender; regression discontinuity;

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  1. Karen E. Dynan & Cecilia Elena Rouse, 1997. "The Underrepresentation of Women in Economics: A Study of Undergraduate Economics Students," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 350-368, December.
  2. Kevin N. Rask & Elizabeth M. Bailey, 2002. "Are Faculty Role Models? Evidence from Major Choice in an Undergraduate Institution," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 99-124, June.
  3. Guido Imbens & Thomas Lemieux, 2007. "Regression Discontinuity Designs: A Guide to Practice," NBER Technical Working Papers 0337, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Charles Ballard & Marianne Johnson, 2005. "Gender, Expectations, And Grades In Introductory Microeconomics At A Us University," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(1), pages 95-122.
  5. John F. Chizmar, 2000. "A Discrete-Time Hazard Analysis of the Role of Gender in Persistence in the Economics Major," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(2), pages 107-118, June.
  6. Austin Nichols, 2007. "RD: Stata module for regression discontinuity estimation," Statistical Software Components S456888, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 14 Jun 2014.
  7. Austin Nichols, 2007. "Causal inference with observational data," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, StataCorp LP, vol. 7(4), pages 507-541, December.
  8. Ann L. Owen & Elizabeth J. Jensen, 2000. "Why Are Women Such Reluctant Economists? Evidence from Liberal Arts Colleges," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 466-470, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Ost, Ben, 2010. "The role of peers and grades in determining major persistence in the sciences," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 923-934, December.

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