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Crises and Productivity in Good Booms and in Bad Booms

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Author Info

  • Gary Gorton

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Yale University)

  • Guillermo Ordonez

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract

Credit booms usually precede financial crises. However, some credit booms end in a crisis (bad booms) and other booms do not (good booms). We document that, while all booms start with an increase in the growth of Total Factor Productivity (TFP), such growth falls much faster subsequently for bad booms. We then develop a simple framework to explain this. Firms finance investment opportunities with short-term collateralized debt. If agents do not produce information about the collateral quality, a credit boom develops, accommodating firms with lower quality projects and increasing the incentives of lenders to acquire information about the collateral, eventually triggering a crisis. When the quality of investment opportunities also grow, the credit boom may not end in a crisis because there is a gradual adoption of low quality projects, but those projects are also of better quality, not inducing information about collateral.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania in its series PIER Working Paper Archive with number 14-008.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: 01 Feb 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pen:papers:14-008

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Keywords: Financial Crises; Credit booms; Productivity;

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References

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  1. Moses Abramovitz, 1956. "Resource and Output Trends in the United States Since 1870," NBER Chapters, in: Resource and Output Trends in the United States Since 1870, pages 1-23 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Bas B. Bakker & Giovanni Dell'Ariccia & Luc Laeven & Jérôme Vandenbussche & Deniz Igan & Hui Tong, 2012. "Policies for Macrofinancial Stability," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 12/06, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Claudio Borio & Mathias Drehmann, 2009. "Assessing the risk of banking crises - revisited," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
  4. Moses Abramovitz, 1956. "Resource and Output Trends in the United States Since 1870," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number abra56-1, January.
  5. S. Rao Aiyagari, 1994. "On the contribution of technology shocks to business cycles," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 22-34.
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Cited by:
  1. Helios Herrera & Guillermo Ordonez & Christoph Trebesch, 2014. "Political Booms, Financial Crises," CESifo Working Paper Series 4935, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Herrera, Helios & Ordoñez, Guillermo & Trebesch, Christoph, 2014. "Political Booms, Financial Crises," Discussion Papers in Economics 21265, University of Munich, Department of Economics.

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