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Are Wages Equal Across Sectors of Production? A Panel Data Analysis for Tradable and Non-Tradable Goods

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  • Achim Schmillen

    ()
    (Osteuropa-Institut, Regensburg (Institut for East European Studies))

Abstract

The assumption that national labor markets are homogenous across tradable and non-tradable goods is common in multisector (open-economy) macro models and crucial for the prominent Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis. This study tests it with a novel method to distinguish the tradable and non-tradable sectors grounded in economic theory, modern empirical methods and a large and detailed macro data set. It finds that both the internal relationship between productivity and wages in the tradable and non-tradable sectors postulated by the Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis and its external transmission mechanism are rejected.

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Paper provided by Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies) in its series Working Papers with number 285.

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Length: 28
Date of creation: Jun 2010
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Handle: RePEc:ost:wpaper:285

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  1. Paul Bergin & Reuven Glick & Alan M. Taylor, 2004. "Productivity, tradability, and the long-run price puzzle," Working Paper Series 2004-08, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  2. Barry Eichengreen & Poonam Gupta, 2009. "The Two Waves of Service-Sector Growth," Working Papers id:1934, eSocialSciences.
  3. Peter Phillips & Hyungsik Moon, 2000. "Nonstationary panel data analysis: an overview of some recent developments," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 263-286.
  4. Caroline M. Betts & Timothy J. Kehoe, 2008. "Real exchange rate movements and the relative price of non-traded goods," Staff Report 415, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  5. Fabio Ghironi & Marc J. Melitz, 2004. "International Trade and Macroeconomic Dynamics with Heterogeneous Firms," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 599, Boston College Department of Economics.
  6. Josip Tica & Ivo Družić, 2006. "The Harrod-Balassa-Samuelson Effect: A Survey of Empirical Evidence," EFZG Working Papers Series 0607, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb.
  7. Balázs Égert & Imed Drine & Kirsten Lommatzsch & Christophe Rault, 2005. "The Balassa-Samuelson Effect in Central and Eastern Europe: Myth or Reality?," Documents de recherche 05-15, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
  8. Berthold Herrendorf & Akos Valentinyi, . "The Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis Forty Years Later," Working Papers 2180043, Department of Economics, W. P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University.
  9. Jeong-Joon Lee, 2005. "Persistent wage differential and its implications on the Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(10), pages 643-648.
  10. William T. Dickens & Lawrence F. Katz, 1987. "Inter-Industry Wage Differences and Theories of Wage Determination," NBER Working Papers 2271, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Smith, Ron, 1995. "Estimating long-run relationships from dynamic heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 79-113, July.
  12. Marcel P. Timmer & Mary O’Mahony & Bart van Ark, 2007. "EU KLEMS Growth and Productivity Accounts: An Overview," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 14, pages 71-85, Spring.
  13. Summers, Robert & Heston, Alan, 1991. "The Penn World Table (Mark 5): An Expanded Set of International Comparisons, 1950-1988," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(2), pages 327-68, May.
  14. Richard Frensch, 2006. "Balassa-Samuelson, Product Differentiation and Transition," Working Papers 266, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies).
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Cited by:
  1. Frensch, Richard & Schmillen, Achim, 2011. "Can we identify Balassa-Samuelson effects with measures of product variety?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 98-108, March.
  2. Olivier CARDI & Romain RESTOUT, 2013. "Imperfect Mobility of Labor across Sectors: a Reappraisal of the Balassa-Samuelson Effect," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2013002, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  3. Wessel N. Vermeulen, 2011. "External income, De-industrialisation and Labour Mobility," CREA Discussion Paper Series 11-20, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.

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