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Gasoline Prices and Their Relationship to Drunk-Driving Crashes

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Author Info

  • Guangqing Chi
  • Xuan Zhou
  • Timothy McClure
  • Paul Gilbert
  • Arthur Cosby
  • Li Zhang
  • Angela Robertson
  • David Levinson

    ()
    (Nexus (Networks, Economics, and Urban Systems) Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota)

Abstract

his study investigates the relationship between changing gasoline prices and drunk-driving crashes. Specifically, we examine the effects of gasoline prices on drunk-driving crashes in Mississippi by age, gender, and race from 2004Ð2008, a period experiencing great fluctuation in gasoline prices. An exploratory visualization by graphs shows that higher gasoline prices are generally associated with fewer drunk-driving crashes. Higher gasoline prices depress drunk- driving crashes among younger and older drivers, among male and female drivers, and among white, black, and Hispanic drivers. The statistical results suggest that higher gasoline prices lead to lower drunk-driving crashes for female and black drivers. However, alcohol consumption is a better predictor of drunk-driving crashes, especially for male, white, and older drivers.

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File URL: http://nexus.umn.edu/Papers/GasPricesAndDrunkDriving.pdf
File Function: First version, 2010
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group in its series Working Papers with number 201106.

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Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Accident Analysis and Prevention 43(1) January 2011, Pages 194-203.
Handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:gaspricesanddrunkdriving

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Postal: Dept. of Civil Engineering, 500 Pillsbury Drive SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
Phone: +01 (612) 625-6354
Fax: +01 (612) 626-7750
Web page: http://nexus.umn.edu
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Related research

Keywords: Drunk-driving crashes; gasoline prices; alcohol consumption; Mississippi;

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  1. Noland, Robert B., 2005. "Fuel economy and traffic fatalities: multivariate analysis of international data," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(17), pages 2183-2190, November.
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  1. Gasoline Prices and Their Relationship to Drunk-Driving Crashes
    by Ariel Goldring in Free Market Mojo on 2010-06-07 11:42:18
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Cited by:
  1. Guangqing Chi & Jeremy Porter & Arthur Cosby & David Levinson, 2009. "A Time Geography Approach to Understanding the Impact of Gasoline Price Changes on Traffic Safety," Working Papers, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group 000092, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.

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