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Open Door Policy and China's Rapid Growth: Evidence from City-level Data

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  • Shang-Jin Wei

Abstract

There is clear evidence that during 1980-90 more exports are positively associated with higher growth rates across Chinese cities. In comparison, in the late 1980s, the contribution to growth comes mainly from foreign investment. The contribution of foreign investment comes in the form of technological and managerial spillover across firms as opposed to an infusion of new capital. Finally, there is nothing magical about the high growth rates of Chinese coastal areas other than their effective utilization of foreign investment and exports.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 4602.

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Date of creation: Dec 1993
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Publication status: published as Growth Theories in Light of the East Asian Experience, Takatoshi Ito and Anne O. Krueger, eds., (Chicago: University of Chicago Press: 1995), pp 73-98.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4602

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  1. David K. Backus & Patrick J. Kehoe & Timothy J. Kehoe, 1992. "In search of scale effects in trade and growth," Staff Report 152, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  2. Paul Romer, 1989. "Endogenous Technological Change," NBER Working Papers 3210, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Luis A. Rivera-Batiz & Paul M. Romer, 1990. "Economic Integration and Endogenous Growth," NBER Working Papers 3528, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," NBER Working Papers 3577, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2232, David K. Levine.
  6. Young, Alwyn, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(2), pages 369-405, May.
  7. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Juann H. Hung, 2008. "China's Approach to Capital Flows Since 1978: Working Paper 2008-02," Working Papers 19565, Congressional Budget Office.
  2. Gerald Epstein & Elissa Braunstein, 2002. "Bargaining Power and Foreign Direct Investment in China: Can 1.3 Billion Consumers Tame the Multinationals?," Working Papers wp45, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  3. Simon Alder & Lin Shao & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2013. "Economic reforms and industrial policy in a panel of Chinese cities," UBSCENTER - Working Papers 005, UBS International Center of Economics in Society - Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  4. Kanbur, Ravi & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2001. "Fifty Years Of Regional Inequality In China: A Journey Through Revolution, Reform And Openness," Working Papers 7236, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  5. Shang-Jin Wei & Yi Wu, 2001. "Globalization and Inequality: Evidence from Within China," NBER Working Papers 8611, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Hong Li & Zinan Liu & Ivonia Rebelo, 1998. "Testing the Neoclassical Theory of Economic Growth: Evidence from Chinese Provinces," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 117-132, May.
  7. WHALLEY, John & XIN, Xian, 2010. "China's FDI and non-FDI economies and the sustainability of future high Chinese growth," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 123-135, March.
  8. Gordon H. Hanson, 1994. "Regional Adjustment to Trade Liberalization," NBER Working Papers 4713, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Michael Hübler, 2009. "Energy Saving Technology Diffusion via FDI and Trade: A CGE Model of China," Kiel Working Papers 1479, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  10. Edward M. Graham & Erika Wada, 2001. "Foreign Direct Investment in China: Effects on Growth and Economic Performance," Working Paper Series WP01-3, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  11. Hübler, Michael, 2011. "Technology diffusion under contraction and convergence: A CGE analysis of China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 131-142, January.

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