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Open door policy and China's rapid growth: evidence from city-level data

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  • Shang-Jin Wei

Abstract

There is clear evidence that during 1980-90 more exports are positively associated with higher growth rates across Chinese cities. In comparison, in the late 1980s, the contribution to growth comes mainly from foreign investment. The contribution of foreign investment comes in the form of technological and managerial spillover across firms as opposed to an infusion of new capital. Finally, there is nothing magical about the high growth rates of Chinese coastal areas other than their effective utilization of foreign investment and exports.
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Suggested Citation

  • Shang-Jin Wei, 1993. "Open door policy and China's rapid growth: evidence from city-level data," Pacific Basin Working Paper Series 93-09, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfpb:93-09
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wei, Shang-Jin & Wu, Yi, 2001. "Globalization and Inequality: Evidence from within China," CEPR Discussion Papers 3088, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Kanbur, Ravi & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2001. "Fifty Years of Regional Inequality in China: A Journey through Revolution, Reform and Openness," CEPR Discussion Papers 2887, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Simon Alder & Lin Shao & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2012. "The Effect of Economic Reform and Industrial Policy in a Panel of Chinese Cities," DEGIT Conference Papers c017_061, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    4. Shahid Yusuf & Kaoru Nabeshima, 2009. "Growth through Innovation : An Industrial Strategy for Shanghai," World Bank Other Operational Studies 18613, The World Bank.
    5. Su, Yaqin & Liu, Zhiqiang, 2016. "The impact of foreign direct investment and human capital on economic growth: Evidence from Chinese cities," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 97-109.
    6. Simon Alder & Lin Shao & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2016. "Economic reforms and industrial policy in a panel of Chinese cities," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 305-349, December.
    7. Hanson, Gordon H., 1998. "Regional adjustment to trade liberalization," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 419-444, July.
    8. Karen Fisher-Vanden & Rebecca Terry, 2009. "Is technology acquisition enough to improve China's product quality? Evidence from firm-level panel data," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 21-38.
    9. WHALLEY, John & XIN, Xian, 2010. "China's FDI and non-FDI economies and the sustainability of future high Chinese growth," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 123-135, March.
    10. Sylvie DEMURGER, 1996. "On the Role of Openness in the Chinese Industrial Growth Process - A city-level assessment," Working Papers 199604, CERDI.
    11. Edward M. Graham & Erika Wada, 2001. "Foreign Direct Investment in China: Effects on Growth and Economic Performance," Working Paper Series WP01-3, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    12. Elissa Braunstein & Gerald Epstein, 2002. "Bargaining Power and Foreign Direct Investment in China: Can 1.3 Billion Consumers Tame the Multinationals?," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-13, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    13. Fleisher, Belton M. & Chen, Jian, 1997. "The Coast-Noncoast Income Gap, Productivity, and Regional Economic Policy in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 220-236, October.
    14. Juann H. Hung, 2008. "China's Approach to Capital Flows Since 1978: Working Paper 2008-02," Working Papers 19565, Congressional Budget Office.
    15. Hong Li & Zinan Liu & Ivonia Rebelo, 1998. "Testing the Neoclassical Theory of Economic Growth: Evidence from Chinese Provinces," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 117-132, May.
    16. Hübler, Michael, 2011. "Technology diffusion under contraction and convergence: A CGE analysis of China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 131-142, January.
    17. Sylvie Démurger & Claude Jessua, 1996. "Ouverture et croissance industrielle des villes chinoises," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 47(3), pages 841-850.
    18. Palakiyem Kpemoua, 2016. "Exports And Economic Growth In Togo
      [Exportations Et Croissance Economique Au Togo]
      ," Working Papers halshs-01332738, HAL.
    19. Yu, Kang & Xin, Xian & Guo, Ping & Liu, Xiaoyun, 2011. "Foreign direct investment and China's regional income inequality," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1348-1353, May.
    20. Wei Zheng & Patrick Paul Walsh, 2018. "Economic growth, urbanization and energy consumption," Working Papers 201817, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China ; Economic development;

    JEL classification:

    • F00 - International Economics - - General - - - General
    • P21 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform

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