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Does Government Investment in Local Public Goods Spur Gentrification? Evidence from Beijing

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  • Siqi Zheng
  • Matthew E. Kahn

Abstract

In Beijing, the metropolitan government has made enormous place based investments to increase green space and to improve public transit. We examine the gentrification consequences of such public investments. Using unique geocoded real estate and restaurant data, we document that the construction of the Olympic Village and two recent major subway systems have led to increased new housing supply in the vicinity of these areas, higher local prices and an increased quantity of nearby private chain restaurants.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 17002.

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Date of creation: Apr 2011
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17002

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  1. Holger Sieg & V. Kerry Smith & H. Spencer Banzhaf & Randy Walsh, 2004. "Estimating The General Equilibrium Benefits Of Large Changes In Spatially Delineated Public Goods," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(4), pages 1047-1077, November.
  2. Michael Greenstone & Richard Hornbeck & Enrico Moretti, 2008. "Identifying Agglomeration Spillovers: Evidence from Million Dollar Plants," NBER Working Papers 13833, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Hongbin Cai & J. Vernon Henderson & Qinghua Zhang, 2009. "China's Land Market Auctions: Evidence of Corruption," NBER Working Papers 15067, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Gerald Carlino & N. Edward Coulson, 2002. "Compensating differentials and the social benefits of the NFL," Working Papers 02-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  5. Erik Hurst & Daniel Hartley & Veronica Guerrieri, 2011. "Endogenous Gentrification and Housing Price Dynamics," 2011 Meeting Papers 1418, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Edward L. Glaeser, Jed Kolko, and Albert Saiz, 2001. "Consumer city," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(1), pages 27-50, January.
  7. Zheng, Siqi & Kahn, Matthew E., 2008. "Land and residential property markets in a booming economy: New evidence from Beijing," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 743-757, March.
  8. Waldfogel, Joel, 2008. "The median voter and the median consumer: Local private goods and population composition," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 567-582, March.
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Building Green Cities Using Public/Private Partnerships
    by Matthew E. Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2012-01-28 16:28:00
  2. China's Future Green Cities
    by Matthew E. Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2011-12-02 16:10:00
  3. Electric Vehicle Demand and Public Recharging Stations: Solving a "Catch-22"
    by Matthew E. Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2012-03-24 16:34:00
  4. Urbanization and Economic Development
    by Matthew E. Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2012-06-10 22:13:00
  5. Listen to a Podcast of the Nevada NPR Radio Show on Climate Change Adaptation for Southwest Cities
    by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2012-08-13 22:14:00
  6. Mega-Infrastructure Projects in LDC Cities
    by Matthew E. Kahn in The Reality-Based Community on 2013-01-02 16:04:55
  7. High Speed Rail Versus Austerity
    by Matthew E. Kahn in HBR Blog Network on 2013-04-08 12:00:55
  8. My Harvard Business Review Blog Piece on China's Bullet Trains and a History of My Economic Thought About China
    by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2013-04-08 15:50:00
  9. Exploring Green Cities in China
    by Matthew Kahn in Urbanization Project on 2013-04-09 23:17:09
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Cited by:
  1. Erik Hurst & Daniel Hartley & Veronica Guerrieri, 2011. "Endogenous Gentrification and Housing Price Dynamics," 2011 Meeting Papers 1418, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Siqi Zheng & Matthew E. Kahn, 2013. "Understanding China's Urban Pollution Dynamics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(3), pages 731-72, September.

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