Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The median voter and the median consumer: Local private goods and population composition

Contents:

Author Info

  • Waldfogel, Joel

Abstract

When a product's product provision entails fixed costs, it will be made available only if a sufficient number of people want it. Some products are produced and consumed locally, so that provision requires not only a large group favoring the product but a large number nearby. Just as local governments provide public goods appealing to individuals sharing the median voter's preferences for local public goods, product markets may provide an analogous benefit to individuals sharing living communities whose consumers tend to share his preferences in private goods. Using zip code level data on chain restaurants and restaurants overall, this paper documents how the mix of locally available restaurants responds to the local mix of consumers, with three findings. First, based on survey data on chain restaurant patronage, restaurant preferences differ substantially by race and education. Second, there is a strong relationship between restaurants and population at the zip code level, suggesting that restaurants' geographic markets are small. Finally, the mix of locally available chain restaurants is sensitive to the zip code demographic mix by race and by education. Hence, differentiated product markets provide a benefit--proximity to preferred restaurants--to persons in geographic markets whose customers tend to share their preferences.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WMG-4PCGRRT-3/2/dc3e351fdb4cb59e6381e3bd50fa6ded
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 63 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 567-582

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:63:y:2008:i:2:p:567-582

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622905

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. The Highly Educated Concentrate in "Green Cities"
    by Matthew E. Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2012-05-30 20:01:00
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Winters, John V., 2011. "Human capital, higher education institutions, and quality of life," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(5), pages 446-454, September.
  2. Francesca Mazzolari & David Neumark, 2009. "Immigration and Product Diversity," NBER Working Papers 14900, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Mazzolari, Francesca & Numark, David, 2009. "The Effects of Immigration on the Scale and Composition of Demand: A study of California establishments," MPRA Paper 19217, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Siqi Zheng & Matthew E. Kahn, 2011. "Does Government Investment in Local Public Goods Spur Gentrification? Evidence from Beijing," NBER Working Papers 17002, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Edward L. Glaeser & Stuart S. Rosenthal & William C. Strange, 2009. "Urban Economics and Entrepreneurship," NBER Working Papers 15536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Joel Waldfogel, 2010. "Who Benefits Whom in the Neighborhood? Demographics and Retail Product Geography," NBER Chapters, in: Agglomeration Economics, pages 181-209 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Siqi Zheng & Matthew E. Kahn, 2013. "Understanding China's Urban Pollution Dynamics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(3), pages 731-72, September.
  8. Gabriel Ahlfeldt, 2010. "Blessing or Curse? Appreciation, Amenities and Resistance around the Berlin "Mediaspree"," Working Papers 032, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
  9. Schuetz, Jenny & Kolko, Jed & Meltzer, Rachel, 2012. "Are poor neighborhoods “retail deserts”?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 269-285.
  10. Buechel, Berno & Klein, Jan, 2014. "Do Consumers' Preferences Really Matter? - A Note on Spatial Competition with Restricted Strategies," MPRA Paper 55288, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Hochman, Oded, 2011. "Efficient agglomeration of spatial clubs," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 118-135, January.
  12. Ahlfeldt, Gabriel M. & Wendlan, Nicolai, 2008. "Spatial Determinants of CBD Emergence: A Micro-level Case Study on Berlin∗," MPRA Paper 11572, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Ahlfeldt, Gabriel M., 2011. "Blessing or curse? Appreciation, amenities and resistance to urban renewal," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 32-45, January.
  14. Ryan C. McDevitt, 2011. "Names and Reputations: An Empirical Analysis," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 193-209, August.
  15. Matthew J. Holian & Matthew E. Kahn, 2013. "The Rise of the Low Carbon Consumer City," NBER Working Papers 18735, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Kahn, Matthew E. & Vaughn, Ryan & Zasloff, Jonathan, 2010. "The housing market effects of discrete land use regulations: Evidence from the California coastal boundary zone," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 269-279, December.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:63:y:2008:i:2:p:567-582. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.