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The Effects of Alcohol Policies in Reducing Entry Rates and Time Spent in Foster Care

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  • Sara Markowitz
  • Alison Evans Cuellar
  • Ryan M. Conrad
  • Michael Grossman

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to empirically estimate the propensity for alcohol-related policies to influence rates of entry into foster care and the length of time spent in foster care. Alcohol consumption is believed to be major contributing factor to child maltreatment, associated with an increased likelihood of abuse and longer durations once in foster care. We analyze a panel of state-level foster care entry rates over time, followed by a duration analysis of individual-level cases. The alcohol regulations of interest include beer, wine, and liquor taxes and prices, and a measure of alcohol availability. Overall, these alcohol control policies appear to have limited power to alter foster care entry rates and duration once in care. We find that higher alcohol taxes and prices are not effective in reducing foster care entry rates, however, once in foster care, the duration of stay may be influenced with higher taxes, particularly when the entry was a result of an alcohol abusing parent.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16915.

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Date of creation: Mar 2011
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Publication status: published as “Alcohol Control and Foster Care” (with Sara Markowitz, Alison Cuellar, and Ryan Conrad). Review of Economics of the Household, forthcoming
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16915

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  1. Philip J. Cook & Jan Ostermann & Frank A. Sloan, 2005. "Are Alcohol Excise Taxes Good For Us? Short and Long-Term Effects on Mortality Rates," NBER Working Papers 11138, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Marianne P. Bitler & Madeline Zavodny, 2004. "Child Maltreatment, Abortion Availability, and Economic Conditions," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 2(2), pages 119-141, 06.
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