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The Selection of Migrants and Returnees: Evidence from Romania and Implications

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  • J. William Ambrosini
  • Karin Mayr
  • Giovanni Peri
  • Dragos Radu

Abstract

This paper uses census and survey data to identify the wage earning ability and the selectivity of recent Romanian migrants and returnees. We construct measures of selection across skill groups and estimate the average and the skills-specific premium for migration and return for three typical destinations of Romanian migrants after 1990. We find evidence for a sorting of migrants consistent with skill compensation in destination countries. The premium to return migration increases with migrants' skills and drives the positive selection of returnees. Based on the rationality of these migration decisions, a model of education, migration and return predicts positive long-run effects of increased migration for average skills and wages in Romania.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16912.

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Date of creation: Mar 2011
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16912

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Biavaschi, Costanza, 2013. "Fifty Years of Compositional Changes in U.S. Out-Migration, 1908-1957," IZA Discussion Papers 7258, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Michael A. Clemens, 2011. "Economics and Emigration: Trillion-Dollar Bills on the Sidewalk?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 83-106, Summer.
  3. Mario Liebensteiner, 2012. "Estimating the Income Gain of Seasonal Labour Migration," WIFO Working Papers, WIFO 430, WIFO.
  4. Biavaschi, Costanza, 2012. "Recovering the Counterfactual Wage Distribution with Selective Return Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 6795, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Nifo, Annamaria & Pagnotta, Stefano & Scalera, Domenico, 2011. "The best and brightest. Selezione positiva e brain drain nelle migrazioni interne italiane
    [The best and brightest. Positive selection and brain drain in Italian internal migrations]
    ," MPRA Paper 34506, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Cristian ÎNCALTARAU & Sorin-Stefan MAHA & Liviu-George MAHA, 2011. "A Broader Look on Migration: A Two Way Interaction Between Development and Migration in the Country Of Origin," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 8, pages 285-297, December.
  7. Biavaschi, Costanza & Elsner, Benjamin, 2013. "Let's Be Selective about Migrant Self-Selection," IZA Discussion Papers 7865, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Jorge De la Roca, 2011. "Selection in initial and return migration: Evidence from moves across Spanish cities," Working Papers, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales 2011-21, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales.

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