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The Economics of Migration: An Empirical Analysis with Special Referenceto the Role of Job Mobility

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  • Ann P. Bartel
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    Abstract

    This article continues the work on the analysis of the individual's decision to migrate, but differs from the previous studies by focusing on the relationship between job mobility and migration. First, the proportion of geographic mobility that occurs in conjunction with a job change is calculated. Second, it is shown that the true effects of human capital variables, job characteristics, and family variables on the decision to migrate are best measured when one takes account of the relationship between migration and job mobility. Third, the effect of migration on the wage gains of individuals is studied and again the need for distinguishing among moves that were associated with quits, layoffs, and transfers is clearly shown. Finally, by using three data sets that encompass different age groups (the National Longitudinal Surveys [NLS] of Young and Mature Men and the Coleman-Rossi Retrospective Life History Study), the importance of the relationship between migration and job mobility is demonstrated at different points in the life cycle.

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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w0198.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 0198.

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    Date of creation: Apr 1980
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    Publication status: published as Bartel, Ann P. "The Migration Decision: What Role Does Job Mobility Play?" The American Economic Review, Vol. 69, No. 5, (December 1979), pp. 775-786 .
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:0198

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    1. Greenwood, Michael J, 1969. "An Analysis of the Determinants of Geographic Labor Mobility in the United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 51(2), pages 189-94, May.
    2. Ann P. Bartel & George J. Borjas, 1977. "Middle-Age Job Mobility: Its Determinants and Consequences," NBER Working Papers 0161, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robert E. Hall, 1970. "Why Is the Unemployment Rate So High at Full Employment?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 1(3), pages 369-410.
    4. Bowles, Samuel, 1970. "Migration as Investment: Empirical Tests of the Human Investment Approach to Geographical Mobility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 52(4), pages 356-62, November.
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    Cited by:
    1. Ann P. Bartel & George J. Borjas, 1982. "Wage Growth and Job Turnover: An Empirical Analysis," NBER Working Papers 0285, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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