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Self-esteem achievement through work and socio-demographic disparities in the labor market

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  • Olivier Baguelin

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    (EUREQua)

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    Abstract

    We develop a model in which agents choose whether to achieve self-esteem through work. When they do, they develop an intrinsic motivation to effort. Depending on the characteristics of the job to be filled, an employer may try, or not, to encourage this intrinsic motivation by an adequately designed contract. Although equally productive, assuming that agents from distinct socio-demographic groups differ in their propensity to achieve self-esteem through work, this may lead to unequal access to employment. We analyse the consequences of this model on labor market outcomes. The model can give an account of many important traits of socio-demographic disparities in the labor market (notably of vertical occupational segregation.

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    File URL: ftp://mse.univ-paris1.fr/pub/mse/cahiers2005/V05065.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1) in its series Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques with number v05065.

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    Length: 45 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2005
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:mse:wpsorb:v05065

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    Related research

    Keywords: Employment relation; self-esteem; intrinsic motivation; (seeming) hiring discrimination; occupational segregation; socio-demographic earnings gaps.;

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    References

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    1. Fershtman, Chaim & Weiss, Yoram, 1993. "Social Status, Culture and Economic Performance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(419), pages 946-59, July.
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    13. Harry J. Holzer, 1998. "Employer skill demands and labor market outcomes of blacks and women," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(1), pages 82-98, October.
    14. William A. Darity & Patrick L. Mason, 1998. "Evidence on Discrimination in Employment: Codes of Color, Codes of Gender," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 63-90, Spring.
    15. McCrate, Elaine, 1988. "Gender Differences: The Role of Endogenous Preferences and Collective Action," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 235-39, May.
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    Cited by:
    1. Olivier Baguelin, 2005. "Strategic interactions in the labor market, self-esteem motivations and socio-demographic disparities," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques v05063, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).

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