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Consequences of trade liberalization on the labor market in developing economy : The case of Tunisia

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  • Ilham Haouas

    (Ced-Team - University of Paris 1)

  • Mahmoud Yagoubi

    (Crifes-Matisse - University of Paris 1)

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    Abstract

    This paper investigates short and long run effects of trade liberalization on employment and wages using a specific factor trade model. Employment and wage equations areestimated using data (1971-1996) for importable and exportable sectors in Tunisia. Results fromempirical testing using the model find some supports for the theoretical predictions of Edwards(1988) for the exportable sector. On the other hand, in the importable sectors, we find resultsthat are opposed to those predicted by Edwards (1988) since employment and wages increase. Apossible reason for the divergence of theory and practice is that the Edward's model is premisedon the basis of a fixed supply of labour. Exportable employment could therefore only rise ifimportable employment fell. However, as we have seen, the supply of labour increaseddramatically in Tunisia as women entered the labour market. This allowed employment inimportable to be maintained (even slightly increase) as the exportable sector expanded.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV in its series Documents de travail with number 64.

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    Length: 11 pages
    Date of creation: Oct 2001
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    Handle: RePEc:mon:ceddtr:64

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    1. John M. Abowd & Thomas Lemieux, 1990. "The Effects of International Competiton on Collective Bargaining Outcomes: A Comparison of the United States and Canada," NBER Working Papers 3352, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Arulampalam, W. & Robin A. Naylor & Jeremy P. Smith, 2002. "University of Warwick," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002 9, Royal Economic Society.
    3. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
    4. Milner, Chris & Wright, Peter, 1998. "Modelling Labour Market Adjustment to Trade Liberalisation in an Industrialising Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 509-28, March.
    5. Mussa, Michael, 1978. "Dynamic Adjustment in the Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 775-91, October.
    6. Brecher, Richard A, 1974. "Minimum Wage Rates and the Pure Theory of International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 88(1), pages 98-116, February.
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