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Fiscal Transparency and Fiscal Policy Outcomes in OECD Countries

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Author Info

  • James E. Alt

    (Harvard University)

  • David Dreyer Lassen

    (Economic Policy Research Unit, University of Copenhagen)

Abstract

It is widely believed and often argued that fiscal, or budgetary, transparency has large, positive effects on fiscal performance. However, the evidence linking transparency and fiscal policy outcomes is far from compelling. We present a career-concerns model with political parties to analyze the effects of fiscal transparency on public debt accumulation. To test the predictions of the model, we construct a replicable index of fiscal transparency. Simultaneous estimates of debt and transparency on 19-country OECD data strongly confirm that a higher degree of fiscal transparency is associated with lower public debt and deficits.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics in its series EPRU Working Paper Series with number 03-02.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kud:epruwp:03-02

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Cited by:
  1. Sophia Gollwitzer, . "Budget Institutions and Fiscal Performance in Africa," Discussion Papers 10/02, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
  2. Peter Montiel & Luis Servén, 2006. "Macroeconomic Stability in Developing Countries: How Much Is Enough?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 151-178.
  3. Emanuele Bracco & Francesco Porcelli & Michela Redoano, 2013. "Political Competition, Tax Salience and Accountability: Theory and Some Evidence from Italy," CESifo Working Paper Series 4167, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Massimo Bordignon & Santino Piazza, 2010. "Who do you Blame in Local Finance? An Analysis of Municipal Financing in Italy," CESifo Working Paper Series 3100, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Ashraf, Quamrul & Galor, Oded, 2013. "Genetic Diversity and the Origins of Cultural Fragmentation," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 125, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  6. Amoroso Nicolás, 2008. "Transparency and Numeric Rules in the Budgeting Process: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers 2008-13, Banco de México.
  7. Yongseok Shin & Rachel Glennerster, 2003. "Is Transparency Good for You, and Can the IMF Help?," IMF Working Papers 03/132, International Monetary Fund.
  8. International Monetary Fund, 2005. "Fiscal Transparency and Economic Outcomes," IMF Working Papers 05/225, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Andrew Tiffin & Christian B. Mulder & Charalambos Christofides, 2003. "The Link Between Adherence to International Standards of Good Practice, Foreign Exchange Spreads, and Ratings," IMF Working Papers 03/74, International Monetary Fund.

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