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Is Internet Job Search Still Ineffective?

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Author Info

  • Kuhn, Peter J.

    ()
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  • Mansour, Hani

    ()
    (University of Colorado Denver)

Abstract

While the Internet has been found to reduce trading frictions in a number of other markets, existing research has failed to detect such an effect in the labor market. In this paper, we replicate Kuhn and Skuterud's (2004) study – which found that Internet job search (IJS) was associated with longer unemployment durations in 1998/2000 – using comparable data from a decade later. We find that IJS now appears to be effective: it reduces individual workers' unemployment durations by about 25 percent. This finding is robust to controls for workers' AFQT scores and detailed indicators of Internet access. IJS appears to be most effective in reducing unemployment durations when used to contact friends and relatives, to send out resumes or fill out applications, and also to look at ads. We detect no effect of IJS on wage growth between jobs.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5955.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5955

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Related research

Keywords: Internet; job search; unemployment; durations;

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References

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  1. Addison, John T. & Portugal, Pedro, 1998. "Job Search Methods and Outcomes," ZEW Discussion Papers 98-41, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  2. Harry J. Holzer, 1986. "Search Method Use by Unemployed Youth," NBER Working Papers 1859, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Osberg, L., 1989. "Fishing In Different Pools: Job Search Strategies And Job-Finding Success In Canada In The Early 1980s," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 89-03, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  4. Betsey Stevenson, 2009. "The Internet and Job Search," NBER Chapters, in: Studies of Labor Market Intermediation, pages 67-86 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Weber, Andrea & Mahringer, Helmut, 2002. "Choice and Success of Job Search Methods," Economics Series 125, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  6. Peter Kuhn & Mikal Skuterud, 2004. "Internet Job Search and Unemployment Durations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 218-232, March.
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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Has the Internet reduced job market frictions?
    by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2011-10-11 14:17:00
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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Cited by:
  1. Fairlie, Robert W., 2012. "The effects of home access to technology on computer skills: Evidence from a field experiment," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 243-253.
  2. Lehmann, Etienne & Montero Ledezma, Paola L. & Van der Linden, Bruno, 2013. "Inefficient Equilibrium Unemployment in a Duocentric Economy with Matching Frictions," IZA Discussion Papers 7828, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Poeschel, Friedrich, 2012. "The time trend in the matching function," IAB Discussion Paper 201203, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  4. Vanessa LUTGEN & Bruno VAN DER LINDEN, 2013. "Regional Equilibrium Unemployment Theory at the Age of the Internet," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2013024, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  5. Lisa J. Dettling, 2013. "Broadband in the labor market: The impact of residential high speed internet on married women's labor force participation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-65, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  6. Naomi E. Feldman & Peter Katuscak & Laura Kawano, 2013. "Taxpayer confusion over predictable tax liability changes: evidence from the Child Tax Credit," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-66, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  7. Constantin Mang, 2012. "Online Job Search and Matching Quality," Ifo Working Paper Series Ifo Working Paper No. 147, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

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