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Tipping and Residential Segregation: A Unified Schelling Model

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  • Zhang, Junfu

    ()
    (Clark University)

Abstract

This paper presents a Schelling-type checkerboard model of residential segregation formulated as a spatial game. It shows that although every agent prefers to live in a mixed-race neighborhood, complete segregation is observed almost all of the time. A concept of tipping is rigorously defined, which is crucial for understanding the dynamics of segregation. Complete segregation emerges and persists in the checkerboard model precisely because tipping is less likely to occur to such residential patterns. Agent-based simulations are used to illustrate how an integrated residential area is tipped into complete segregation and why this process is irreversible. This model incorporates insights from Schelling's two classical models of segregation (the checkerboard model and the neighborhood tipping model) and puts them on a rigorous footing. It helps us better understand the persistence of residential segregation in urban America.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 4413.

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Length: 54 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2009
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Journal of Regional Science, 2011, 51(1), 167-193
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4413

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Related research

Keywords: checkerboard model; tipping; residential segregation;

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Cited by:
  1. Sébastian Grauwin & Florence Goffette-Nagot & Pablo Jensen, 2010. "Dynamic models of residential ségrégation: an analytical solution," Post-Print halshs-00502758, HAL.
  2. Zhang, Junfu & Zheng, Liang, 2014. "Are Ghettos Good or Bad? Evidence from U.S. Internal Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 8093, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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