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The Life-Cycle and the Business-Cycle of Wage Risk: A Cross-Country Comparison

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  • Bayer, Christian

    ()
    (University of Bonn)

  • Juessen, Falko

    ()
    (University of Wuppertal)

Abstract

This paper provides a cross-country comparison of life-cycle and business-cycle fluctuations in the dispersion of household-level wage innovations. We draw our inference from household panel data sets for the US, the UK, and Germany. First, we find that household characteristics explain about 25% of the dispersion in wages within an age group in all three countries. Second, the cross-sectional variance of wages is almost linearly increasing in household age in all three countries, but with increments being smaller in the European data. Third, we find that wage risk is procyclical in Germany while it is countercyclical in the US and acyclical in the UK, pointing towards labor market institutions being pivotal in determining the cyclical properties of labor market risk.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 4402.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2009
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Economics Letters, 2012, 117 (3), 831-833
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4402

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Related research

Keywords: business cycle; uncertainty fluctuations; heterogeneity; life-cycle risk; wages;

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Cited by:
  1. Volker Tjaden & Ralph Lütticke & Lien Pham & Christian Bayer, 2013. "Household Income Risk, Nominal Frictions, and Incomplete Markets," 2013 Meeting Papers 1270, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Hans Fehr & Manuel Kallweit & Fabian Kindermann, 2013. "Reforming Family Taxation in Germany - Labor Supply vs. Insurance Effects," CESifo Working Paper Series 4386, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Dirk Krüger, 2009. "Inequality Trends for Germany in the Last Two Decades: A Tale of Two Countries," MEA discussion paper series 09184, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  4. Bachmann, Ruediger & Bayer, Christian, 2009. "Firm-specific productivity risk over the business cycle: facts and aggregate implications," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2009,15, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  5. Jüßen, Falko & Bayer, Christian, 2013. "Happiness and the Persistence of Income Shocks," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79915, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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