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Capital Account Liberalization for a Small, Open Economy

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  • Andreas Hauskrecht

    (Department of Business Economics and Public Policy, Indiana University Kelley School of Business)

  • Nhan Le

    (Economics Department, Indiana University)

Abstract

We survey the ongoing debate on pros and cons for an early and comprehensive liberalization of capital flows by emerging economies. We examine the main theoretical assumptions that would lead to positive effects on output growth and consumption volatility and reflect them with recent literature on market imperfections and information deficiencies. We find little evidence for a positive effect of free capital flows on economic growth and stability for emerging economies. We apply these main results to Vietnam as an example for an open emerging economy and discuss the main explanatory factors that may lead to negative impacts of an early and premature liberalization of capital flows. For small, open economies, absorption capacity for capital is limited. Excessive capital inflows might cause Dutch disease phenomena and asymmetric information might trigger an inefficient use of capital. In particular, we stress potential negative impacts of capital flows on the currency risk premium. Finally, we argue that for a partly dollarized economy as Vietnam a premature liberalization of capital flows might significantly increase financial sector instability. In conclusion, we emphasize the importance of a prudential sequencing of capital account liberalization and strong domestic institutions such as an independent central bank, proper financial regulation and supervision and macroeconomic stability as necessary pre-conditions.

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File URL: http://www.bus.indiana.edu/riharbau/RePEc/iuk/wpaper/bepp2005-13-hauskrecht-le.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy in its series Working Papers with number 2005-13.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:iuk:wpaper:2005-13

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  1. Razin, A. & Sadka, E. & Yuen, C.-W., 1999. "Excessive FDI Flows under Asymmetric Information," Papers 27-99, Tel Aviv.
  2. Andreas Hauskrecht & Nguyen Thanh Hai, 2004. "Dollarization in Viet Nam," Working Papers 2004-25, Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy.
  3. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1996. "The twin crises: the causes of banking and balance-of-payments problems," International Finance Discussion Papers 544, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Kristin J. Forbes, 2004. "Capital Controls: Mud in the Wheels of Market Discipline," NBER Working Papers 10284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Hali J. Edison & Michael W. Klein & Luca Antonio Ricci & Torsten Sløk, 2004. "Capital Account Liberalization and Economic Performance: Survey and Synthesis," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 51(2), pages 2.
  6. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen Reinhart, 2003. "The Center and the Periphery: The Globalization of Financial Turmoil," NBER Working Papers 9479, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Arteta, Carlos & Eichengreen, Barry & Wyplosz, Charles, 2001. "When Does Capital Account Liberalization Help More Than it Hurts?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2910, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Michael W. Klein & Giovanni Olivei, 1999. "Capital Account Liberalization, Financial Depth and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 7384, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Torsten Sløk & Michael Klein & Luca Antonio Ricci & Hali J. Edison, 2002. "Capital Account Liberalization and Economic Performance," IMF Working Papers 02/120, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Geert Bekaert & Campbell R. Harvey & Christian Lundblad, 2001. "Does Financial Liberalization Spur Growth?," NBER Working Papers 8245, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Fiess, Norbert, 2003. "Capital flows, country risk, and contagion," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2943, The World Bank.
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Cited by:
  1. Michael G. Plummer, 2010. "Regional Monitoring of Capital Flows and Coordination of Financial Regulation: Stakes and Options for Asia," Working Papers id:3008, eSocialSciences.
  2. Ulrich Camen, 2006. "Monetary policy in Vietnam: the case of a transition country," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Monetary policy in Asia: approaches and implementation, volume 31, pages 232-252 Bank for International Settlements.
  3. Menon, Jayant, 2009. "Managing Success in Viet Nam: Macroeconomic Consequences of Large Capital Inflows with Limited Policy Tools," Working Papers on Regional Economic Integration 27, Asian Development Bank.

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