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The Socio-Economic Impact of Favela- Bairro: What do the Data Say?

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Author Info

  • Fabio Soares

    (Institute of Economic Research (IPEA) and the International Poverty Center (IPC).)

  • Yuri Suarez Dillon Soares

    ()
    (Office of Evaluation and Oversight at the Inter-American Development Bank.)

Abstract

In this paper the Brazilian Favela-Bairro neighborhood improvememnt program is assessed regarding its impact on the quality of life of slum residents. Census and administrative data are used to assess impacts on services, income, health, and violence. There are three fundamental conclusions that fall out of the analysis. The first is that the program improved neighborhood services, with the benefits accrueing to a greater degree to the neighborhoods poorest quantiles. In terms of value of property, as measured by rent, and the in most of the health outcomes, however, the data did produced evidence of improvement. The second result is that we see a marked difference in the characterization of the project’s impact when no control group is used. In terms of results a reflexive comparison leads to an over-estimation of project benefits. The last result is perhaps the most important, in part because it qualifies most of the findings of this evaluation. Given the high degree of geographic targeting, yet the relatively small size of targeted units, the data available was inadequate to answer many of the fundamental evaluative questions raised in the introduction and throughout the paper.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE) in its series OVE Working Papers with number 0805.

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Length: 45 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:idb:ovewps:0805

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References

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  1. Cutler, David M & Glaeser, Edward L, 1997. "Are Ghettos Good or Bad?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(3), pages 827-72, August.
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  4. Edward E. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote & Jose A. Scheinkman, 1995. "Crime and Social Interactions," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1738, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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  7. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 1999. "The Rise and Decline of the American Ghetto," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 455-506, June.
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  9. Kanazawa, Mark T., 1996. "Possession is Nine Points of the Law: The Political Economy of Early Public Land Disposal," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 227-249, April.
  10. Besley, Timothy, 1995. "Property Rights and Investment Incentives: Theory and Evidence from Ghana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 903-37, October.
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Cited by:
  1. César P. Bouillon & Luis Tejerina, 2006. "Do We Know What Works?: A Systematic Review of Impact Evaluations of Social Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean," IDB Publications 23598, Inter-American Development Bank.

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